Wednesday, April 12, 2017

"Myn Got dey will suck de very life's blood out of dat old sow, I never seen pigs suck so in all myn life. "









Summary

The artist satirizes the split in party loyalties between the Locofoco and Tammany factions of New York City Democrats. In particular he belittles the Irish immigrants widely recruited by the party at the time. The print may have appeared during the elections of 1836. An Irishman stands on a platform before two booths, one marked "Tammany Committee" and the other "Locofoco Committee," and says, "As I'm a hindependent Helector, I means to give my Vote according to conscience and him as Tips most!" Beyond the platform is a crowd of voters, one holding a sign "Vote for Hoxie" (Joseph Hoxie, a prominent figure in New York Whig politics).
Contributor Names
Robinson, Henry R., -1850.
Sarony, Napoleon, 1821-1896.
Created / Published
N.Y. : Pubd. by H.R. Robinson, 1836.








Summary
A comic scene representing two New York city political factions, the Whigs and the radical Democrats (or "Loco Focos"), as scuffling newsboys. The scene takes place before the half-built Customs House, where several newsboys and a black chimney sweep are gathered watching a scrap involving a ragged youth selling "loco foco" matches and another newsboy. The match-seller raises his fist and threatens, "Oh! you d---d Whiggy." The latter, striking him, "I'll loco poke you." On the left three of the newsboys hold Democratic newspapers the "New York Evening Post" and the "New Era," and a copy of radical reformer Frances ("Fanny") Wright's lectures. One says, with a sidelong glance at the unfortunate match-seller, "I told him he had better not fight." The chimney sweep taunts them, "Does Fanny know you're out?" On the right, a second group of newsboys, holding copies of Whig journals, the "Transcript, Morning Courier and New York Enquirer, Gazette," and the "Evening Star," cheer on the winning fighter.

Contributor Names

Robinson, Henry R., -1850.
Created / Published
N.Y. : Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 1836.



Title: Going the whole hog
Summary
Martin Van Buren's New York political favorites are represented as piglets suckled by a giant sow "The Empire State." The artist's pointed reference is to the exploitation of New York State by the President and his supporters. The piglets nursed by the sow bear the names "The Regency" and "Tammany Hall" (popular names for the state and city Democratic machines respectively), "Weigh master General," the names of various patronage positions and of banks friendly to the administration, and the "Safety Fund." On the left other piglets, representing applications for bank charters and government offices and "The Times," await the sleeping sow's attention. Van Buren (left) and a stout Dutchman (a stereotyped character often used to represent New York State) look on. Van Buren: Was ever man blest with such a fine old sow and litter of pigs! They have made me the greatest man in the Union, and even follow me every where! Dutchman: Myn Got dey will suck de very life's blood out of dat old sow, I never seen pigs suck so in all myn life. Got for damn such a breed! Myn Vrow would not have dem on de farm.
Contributor Names
Robinson, Henry R., -1850.
Created / Published
New York : Printed and published by H.R. Robinson, 1837.





Title: Loco Foco persecution, or custom house, versus caricatures,
Summary
A satire on the publisher's own troubles with the Democratic establishment in New York. In his print shop Henry R. Robinson is confronted by an unidentified man (center, arms crossed) who says, "I am determined this d---d Whig concern shall be shut up till after the Election." The man may be city surveyor and inspector Eli Moore. Robinson, standing with his back to a stove and holding a purse marked "$141," thumbs his nose and retorts, "Does Jesse Hoyt [Democratic strongman and collector of the port] know you're out?" The Custom House was the center of Democratic political control in New York. Robinson, a Whig, apparently ran afoul of the Democrats by his caricatures of Governor William L. Marcy. Marcy had recently been widely criticized for his handling of the Bamber case (see "Executive Mercy/Marcy and the Bambers," no. 1838-5). Two newsboys on the left ask, "Have you got any more of the Bamber Caricatures?" and "I want some more of your Whig Caricatures." Two men stand at the right, waiting to serve a notice of "Distress for Rent in Arrear." One of them says, "I'm afraid we sha'nt get our Rent." A shop clerk watches from behind the counter.
Contributor Names
Clay, Edward Williams, 1799-1857.
Dacre, Henry, approximately 1820-
Robinson, Henry R., -1850.
Created / Published
N.Y. : Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 1838.


No comments:

Post a Comment