Tuesday, February 26, 2019

The Election Fraud -


December 1, 1853, New York Times, The Election Fraud; The Judicial Investigation--Arrest of the Pell Clerk,

December 1, 1853, New York Times, THE ELECTION FRAUD.; Additional Proceedings before Judge Stuart, Yesterday forenoon the judicial investigation in relation to the recent fraud in the First District of the Twen, Ward, was before Judge STUART Ut the Jefferson Police

January 9, 1854, New York Times, NEW-YORK CITY.; AMUSEMENTS THIS EVENING, For Particulars see our Advertising Columns. POLICE AFFAIRS. METEOROLOGICAL REGISTER FIRE IN LONG'S BOOKSTORE. MURDER ON THE OCEAN. Important Decisions in Admiralty. U. S. DISTRICT COURT--JAN. 7, 1854. Before Judge Betts. SUPERIOR COURT--GENERAL TERM, of candidates for members or the Police Department. On Saturday the Board of Aldermen Committee in the Twentieth Ward election fraud, the seat of Cummings and Tucler, met at the City lall. N. Bowditch Blulit appeared in behalf of

April 1, 1854, New York Times, The Sessions Court for April--Important Trials to Come off, third or fourth time since the commencement of the .gs.) to appear and testify on behalf of the people. Another, is the election fraud, perpetrated in the Twentieth Ward last Fall, respecting the election of CUMMvINOs. In addition to

May 16, 1854, New York Times, NEW-YORK CITY.; IRISH CIVIL AND MILITARY UNION. STEALING SHIRTS BY WHOLESALE. A CRIMINAL CHARGE DISMISSED. ABANDONED. SUPERIOR COURT COURT OF GENERAL SESSIONS UNITED STATES CIRCUIT COURT, -Monday

May 17, 1854, New York Times, The Twentieth Ward Election Fraud.; Trial of William Turner, Hugh Mooney and William Turner, Inspectors. Before Hon. Recorder Tillou. FOURTH DAY, proceedings transpired. Not only the private interests of his client, but the public interests were involved.The Twentieth Ward Election Fraud. 'Trial of William Turner, Hugh Mooney and William Turner, Inspectora. Before Hon.

May 18, 1854, New York Times, The Twentieth Ward Election Fraud, The same line of testimony was continued, and a number of witness were called who had voted for Cumming H. Tucker at the First District of the Twentieth Ward, in the late election....

May 19, 1854, New York Times, The Twentieth Ward Election Fraud, At the opening of the Court yesterday the District Attorney rose and stated that, from the evidence in his possession, and given before the Coroner's Jury, it was apparent that Mr. Hays, at the time Dr. Lutener died, was in Harlem, and therefore t…

November 10, 1854, New York Times, KNOW-NOTHING DEMONSTRATION.; GRAND MASS MEETING IN THE PARK. CHARGES OF CORRUPTION AT THE POLLS, DENUNCIATORY RESOLUTIONS. Speeches of Wm. Ross Wallace, Col. Snow, Chauncey Schafier, and others, meeting adjourn to meet in the Park on Monday next, at 5 P. M. The following Committee was appointed to investigate the election fraud in the Sixth Ward. First Ward, Mr. Stokely. * Second Ward, Capt. Tone. Fourth Ward, Ira Buckman,

November 12, 1861, New York Times, The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, PITTSBURGH, Penn., Monday, Nov. 11. The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, to-day, granted a special injunction on the Philadelphia election fraud, restraining CHARLES D. KNIGHT, Prothonotary of Philadelphia County, from delivering the

March 19, 1870, New York Times, THE ELECTION FRAUDS.; More Dilatory Proceedings in the Brooklyn Cases--A Postponement Till Monday, The attendance in the Court of Oyer and Terminer, yesterday morning, was not so large as on previous occasions, when the election fraud cases were set down for a hearing. The Circuit Court calendar having been called over, the"

March 23, 1870, New York Times, BROOKLYN ELECTION FRAUDS.; Manners and Morals of Brooklyn Politicians--Third of the Election Fraud Cases, The Court of Oyer and Terminer was again filled yesterday morning with an audience composed largely of local politicians, who had assembled to watch the development of the system of accumulated fraud which had been the chief destruction of the ele..

March 25, 1870, New York Times, The Sleepy Hollow Tragedy, Brooklyn., tit for the defence, moved Monday, on the ground that (late Mr. GRANVILLE T. JENKS was at prr WunL busy with the election fraud trial in Brooklyn. District-Attorney VAN DEhi. opposed the motion. A short consultation

March 26, 1870, New York Times, Chief-Justice Chase and the Supreme Court,

March 27, 1870, New York Times, The Election Fraud Cases--Motion of the the District-Attorney for Judgment--Sentence Deferred to Thursday Next, In the Kings County Court of Oyer and Terminer, yesterday morning, before Judge GILBERT and Assistant Justices VOORHEES and JOHNSON, District-Attorney MORES moved for judgement in the cases in which convictions had been returned for frauds at the

April 1, 1870, New York Times, The Political Barometer in Brooklyn, However public opinion may differ as to the strict impartiality of tbo charges givon by the Court in the election fraud casey, we think that moderate men of all parties will command the of tbe . Whatever the Associate

May 8, 1870, New York Times, LOCAL NEWS IN BRIEF.; NEW-YORK. BROOKLYN. LONG ISLAND. WESTCHESTER COUNTY. NEW-JERSEY, a razor. SMte *has been for some time in weak ,-and was very low-6. when Sound !ug he was quite dead. The trial of the election fraud cases will be resumed on Monday morning at the Court of Oyer , before Judge Bgt5AsD and a jury

May 10, 1870, New York Times, LOCAL NEWS IN BRIEF.; NEW-YORK. BROOKLYN. NEW-JERSEY, neat. The Court of Oyer and Terminer met yesterday morning, but owing to the of several witnesses the hearing of the election fraud cases was adjourned till today at 10 o'clock. The route of the new Parl- Streets Railroad is

May 28, 1870, New York Times, FORTY-FIRST CONGRESS.; SECOND SESSION. SENATE ... HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, because he had honestly and firmly aided Mr. BROOKS, Of New-York, denounced the operation as a fraud, as bad as any election fraud ever charged upon parties in New-York. It ain attempt to defraud the minority of the by

May 31, 1870, New York Times, Senator Sherman on Election Frands, from the State Courts of the City of New-York to the United States Courts. Who would think of indicting anybody for an election fraud in a State Court in the City of New-York t Why, Sir, the Judges themselves are elected by those

September 14, 1870, New York Times, Article 1 -- No Title, visitors The Brooklyn Democrats of the "straight' type were beginning to congratulate themselves on the apparently final of election fraud cases. The determined onslaught lately made, by way of reprisal, upon District-Attorney

November 19, 1870, New York Times, REPUBLICANS TO THE FRONT.; Grand Mass-Meeting at the Cooper Institute. Enthusiastic Ratification of the State Ticket. Stirring Resolutions Unanimously Adopted. Tammany Sends a Delegation Headed by Reddy the Blacksmith. Unsuccessful Attempt to Create a Disturbance. The Ruffians Thrust Out by the Police. Speeches of Hon. Roscoe Conkling, Judge Pierrepont, Hon. Geo. Opdyke, Hon. Chas. S. Spencer and Marshal Sharpe---Poems, Songs and Recitations. THE COOPER INSTITUTE MEETING. Another Banner for Ledwith. THE BROOKLYN DEMOCRATS. Mass-Meeting Last Night--Gov. Hoffman Fairs to Appear--A lame Excuse for Him--Speeches of Henry C. Murphy, Hon. James S. Thayer, Richard O'German and Others. The Eleventh Ward Young Democracy. German Republican Rally in the Ninth Congressional District. Grand Republican Demonstration in Jersey City. Political Brevities. THE BROOKLYN REPUBLICANS. Mass-Meeting Last Night--Addresses of Judge Van Cost, Sigismund Kaufman and Others--Sharp Letter from Gen. Butler. OTHER MEETINGS. Mass--Meeting of the Friends of Gen. McMahon The Election Law, reception of votes at the polls; but the subsequent counting is left to the tender mercies of local officials. In our late election, fraud crept in at this stage, and no Federal authority was able to prevent its perpetration, or to

May 5, 1871, New York Times, The Connecticut Election Fraud, sympathy that appears everywhere to exist in these days between a large section of Democracy and fraud. The Connecticut Election Fraud. Systematic corruption of the franchise by voting, repeating, and false counting, seem to have

May 8, 1871, New York Times, The Connecticut Election Fraud Becoming Apparent, The Connecticut Election Fraud Becoming Apparent. HeltTFOan, Conn., Diay 7. The official return from the Fourth Ward of Hew Haven gave JewBLL 579 votes for Governor. The count of the votes, on Fridap, by the Legislative Committee,

May 9, 1871, New York Times, How to Manage an Election, ENGLISH'S friends in Connecticut will never be able to compete with their Tammany backers in working up a successful case of election fraud. Notwithstanding the full and particular instructions they received from Tammany experts,

August 2, 1871, New York Times, MINOR TOPICS, to be opposed to railroad , and Gov. H. is the anti. subsidy candidate, just as TWEED will some day appear se the anti-election-fraud candidate in 4 this State. It has been ascertained that Gov. HeiGxx signed, during the last

November 6, 1871, New York Times, Examine Your Tickets Closely, actors wa,e there such a variety of for election fraud afoot. Tickets with names of candidates misspelt are thrown out in the official canvass as . The City as $ wrth snob tickets, with names . Let

November 8, 1871, New York Times, Fifth Senatorial District, arrest was made the day. In the places of the. j Ward the Norton men would sometimes essay to play their little amea tit election fraud, trot the Reform watchers were . Tun rogues, however, ahu have so elections in the Ward. no

December 10, 1871, New York Times, BROOKLYN NEWS.; The Dissenting Juror in the Election Fraud Case, The dissenting juror who refused to agree upon a verdict in the case o! the election fraud is JOHx O'NattL, who said, in the of a yesterday, that the

December 15, 1871, New York Times, The Election Frauds, The second trial of the election fraud cases being that of The People THOMAS Mc

December 22, 1871, New York Times, MINOR TOPICS, the service demanded of them. The of the jury deserve the immediate attention of the authorities. The treatment of the election-fraud cases by the Oyer and Terminer Grand Jury, yesterday. calls for explanation. After Postponements.

December 23, 1871, New York Times, BROOKLYN NEWS.; The New City Officials. Death of an Old Citizen. Election Fraud Cases Difficulty in Obtaining a Jury. The Small-Pox. Callender's Connection with the Ocean Bank Evidence of the Receiver. Stabbing Affair in Avenue B,

January 3, 1872, New York Times, Criminals Sentenced in the Oyer and Terminer The Election Fraud Cases, In the Court of Oyer and Terminer, , Judge IrressHSac , the prisoners pleaded and were sentenced: James Delancey, three years in State Prison; Charles Marrm,

January 13, 1872, New York Times, THE RING FRAUDS.; An Important Statement by the General Sessions Grand Jury. How they are Hampered by the Oyer and Terminer Jury--They Ask an Explanation of Judge Ingraham--A Protest Against His Action. The Murder of James Fisk. Suicide of A Young Austrian. Arrival of the Algeria--Welcome to Hon. James Brooks--John C. Heenan, District-Attorney, echo informed the other jury. Toe impression wit wrung that this jury Lad not the right to indict m the election-fraud cases. -r Grand Jury has equal jurisdiction for indictment, though the trial must be in ibe

January 15, 1872, New York Times, Judge Ingraham's Grand Jury, Ingraham's Grand Jury. not for any apparently beneficial object. No work bas been brought before it. Dreamy hmta were given of election fraud cases that the jury were to examine. But they amounted to nothing. At last we have zhe

April 4, 1872, New York Times, BROOKLYN, The Election Fraud cases are to come up for trial in the City Court today.

October 5, 1872, New York Times, page 1, Caught In The Act; Enormous Scheme for Fraud by Greeleyites Discovered; Thousands of Bogus Naturalization Papers Prepared; Democratic Counties in Pennsylvania to be Flooded with Them; The Fraud Traced Direct to McClure and Randall. Information Lodged with the United States Authorities, The Committee to whom was referred the investigation of the statement that there existed a conspiracy to perpetrate an extensive election fraud on Tuesday next, respectfully report that they have positive evidence that thousands of certificates of naturalization have been printed in the night time in the second story of a printing-office, in Fifth-street, near Locust-street, to which a counterfeit seal ...

October 5, 1872, New York Times, page 8, More "Reconciliation"; How Greeley's "Heart-Broken" Friends in Georgia are Reconciled. Kuklux Outrage and Official Fraud and Chicanery in Universal Use to Carry the State-- The Colored Republicans Actually Disfranchised. A Republican Election Manager Beaten and Left on a Railroad Track for Dead by Disguised Men--Other Outrages, ATLANTA, Ga., Oct. 4.—The sixty-three counties heard from give Smith a majority of over 30,000. Less that half the negro vote was cast.
Taken all in all, there has, perhaps, never been, on this continent, an election fraud comparable with the one in this State two days ago. Considering a fair election impossible under the existing Democratic rule here, and unwilling to subject the negroes to further outrage and personal danger, the Chairman of the Republican State Central Committee will call a meeting of the Committee and propose the withdrawal of all candidates and electors on the Republican ticket.

December 9, 1873, New York Times, The Britton Investigation, Committee of replied that no more testimony would be offered on any of the charges, except those to the Risbeck case and the election fraud cases. Seven of the ori_Pinal char, hero been abandoned alto; ether. With .-d to the charge,

December 12, 1873, New York Times, THE BRITTON INVESTIGATION.; THE TESTIMONY FOR THE DEFENSE GRAND JURORS AND THE DEFENDANT TESTIFY,

December 13, 1873, New York Times, THE BRITTON INVESTIGATION,  for the people. Ger. Tracy conduct the defense. Tlie _ation of tl:e charges sounded oa the election fraud cases r. resumed, and a mass of testimony el:c::. ed which has already been g, to the . A

November 19, 1874, New York Times, LOUISIANA.; THE RETURNING BOARD MR. ARROYO'S POSITION. HELD TO BAIL FOR AN ALLEGED ELECTION FRAUD. THE REFORMED CHURCH CONFERENCE, within twenty-four hours be will resign. The from St. James Parish sre being can. to-day.

October 20, 1875, New York Times, THE POLICE SYSTEM.; THE EVIDENCE GIVEN YESTERDAY ELECTION FRAUD CASES FORGED BOND CASES, AND HOW THE CENTRAL OFFICE DETECTIVES WORKED THEM UP THE INDICTMENTS OF COMAN, NORTON,AND WELSH. EVIDENCE OF MR. GEORGE H. BANGS. EVIDENCE OF HENRY C. ALLEN, Hess, and Dessar. Mr. Townsend, counsel to the committee was absent.

January 19, 1877, New York Times, THE MISSISSIPPI ELECTION.; FRAUD USED TO REMOVE REPUBLICAN BALLOTS CAST WHERE INTIMIDATION COULD NOT PREVENT VOTING--DEMOCRATIC BALLOTS SUBSTITUTED,

February 4, 1877, New York Times, PROCEEDINGS OF THE COMMISSION.; MR. O'CONOR'S ARGUMENT ON THE ADMISSIBILITY OF EVIDENCE. DEBATE ON MR. O'CONOR'S SUGGESTION. MR. BLACK'S ARGUMENT. THE DEMOCRATIC SIDE OF THE QUESTION. ANOTHER ARGUMENT BY MR. BLACK. THE REPUBLICAN SIDE OF THE CASE. HON. E.W. STOUGHTON'S ADDRESS,

November 15, 1877, New York Times, COURT NOTES, States Marshal Payn received a pardon yesterday from President Hayes for John Volz, who was convicted of perjury in an election fraud case in November, 1876, and sentenced to three years' imprisonment. The pardon was recommended by

December 13, 1877, New York Times, ALLEGED ELECTION FRAUD,

June 19, 1878, New York Times, MAINE DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION.; THE USUAL KIND OF A PLATFORM ADOPTED ALONZO GARCELON NOMINATED FOR GOVERNOR A ROW OVER A LIQUOR RESOLUTION,
national bank bills. -That we fully the action of the majority of the House of Representatives in their investigation of the election fraud, by which the country was cheated and robbed of the honest and rightful possession of the

June 28, 1878, New York Times, Article 2 -- No Title, In these days of Louisiana " ", and election fraud investigations, it will not be to recall une of the yet tricks by which Hon. SLIDErLL, of Democratic fame, used to evade the Election law and manipulate At Lhe time in question, one

July 10, 1878, New York Times, SOUTHERN REPUBLICANS.; AN ADDRESS TO ALABAMA VOTERS. WHAT THE DEMOCRATS HAVE DONE INACTIVE ELECTION LAWS "YOU CAN OUTVOTE US, BUT WE CANNOT COUNT YOU" THE CONVENTION'S PLATFORM,

November 26, 1878, New York Times, THE ELECTION FRAUD CASES.; DISCHARGE OF TWO OF THE PRISONERS ON HABEAS CORPUS,
...arrested and committed to jail on election day charged with having registered falsely from No. 61 Thompson street. of their naturalization.

December 14, 1878, New York Times, FORTY-FIFTH CONGRESS.; SUMMARY, total votes, was discussed of ble length, and finally passed-35 to .".G. ;llr. Blnin then made an effort to have his election fraud .tions taken up, but the Senate rejected his motion and until Monday. In the Hovse of

December 8, 1879, New York Times, The Maine Election Fraud, Auausma, ., Dee. 7.-A petition is in circulation horn urging upon the Governor and Council the necessity of investigating the charges of Charles B. Rounds that the election returns have been with. Messrs.

June 5, 1880, New York Times, FORTY-SIXTH CONGRESS; SECOND SESSION--June 4. SENATE. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, On motion of Mr. WALLACE, of Pennsylvania, the resolution, recently submitted by him, continuing the Committee on Frauds in the late election and authorizing it to sit and file reports during the

November 17, 1880, New York Times, ACCUSED OF ELECTION FRAUD,
Nov. 1(i.-Charles's. Fislier, a young lawyer, and a worker in the Republican Party, was before United States Commissioner Ilobper to-day, on a charge of attempting fraud upon the ballot-boa in

November 25, 1880, New York Times, THE RIGHTS OF VOTERS.; SOME INTERESTING DECISIONS AT THE LATE TERM OF THE UNITED STATES COURT IN AUBURN, Albany. He pleaded guilty and was given a light sentence. Judge ~' stated in this case that he thought in most of the election fraud cases persons in and of influence and standing; in the community were most at fault. IIe criticised

December 20, 1881, New York Times, A JURYMAN IN TROUBLE.; HOW A PHILADELPHIA ELECTION FRAUD TRIAL WAS SUDDENLY STOPPED,
of ingenious devices to obstruct justice that he was finally brought to trial. finally brought to trial. I3o is now hold as a close prisoner, bail

December 22, 1881, New York Times, CONVICTED OF ELECTION FRAUD.; DAVID MONAT'S PLEA FOR MERCY AND THE JUDGE'S REBUKE,
Dec. 21.-The trial of David Monat for election frauds, which was suddenly stopped Monday through the discovery of an interloper on the jury

April 12, 1882, New York Times, EXPOSING BOURBON TRICKERY.; EVIDENCE IN SOUTH CAROLINA ELECTION CASES--PERSECUTING GOVERNMENT WITNESSES, assistant to the Attorney-General, will start tomorrow , by direction of hfr. Brewster, for South Carolina to tako part iu the election fraud trials. He does not know what particular work he is to do.

May 29, 1882, New York Times, TRUTH FROM THE SOUTH; THE STILL SOLID FRONT OF THE DEMOCRACY. EXPECTING NO BENEFIT FROM THE ADMINISTRATION. ALABAMA. BERATING MISTAKES, BUT FOLLOWING THE LEADERS--THE PRESIDENT DENOUNCED. ARKANSAS. STRONG FOR TRUE DEMOCRACY--NO ADMIRATION FOR ARTHUR. FLORIDA. A CANDID OPINION OF THE LEADERS--A STRICTLY PARTISAN ADMINISTRATION. GEORGIA. THE PARTY SOLID--ARTHUR LOOKED UPON AS A PARTISAN. LOUISIANA. SOME DISSATISFACTION WITH LEADERS-- FAVORABLY DISPOSED TO THE PRESIDENT. MISSISSIPPI. MASSES IN HEARTY ACCORD WITH LEADERS-- EFFECT OF THE LEVEE PROCLAMATION. NORTH CAROLINA. UNITED ON NATIONAL MATTERS--INDIFFERENCE TO THE ADMINISTRATION SOUTH CAROLINA. DISSATISFACTION ONLY WITH MANAGERS-- THE PRESIDENT DECIDEDLY UNPOPULAR. TEXAS. UNITED ON GENERAL POLICY--NOT SATISFIED WITH THE ADMINISTRATION, question, and thu as was presented to the outside world of the Republican Leaders in Congress had assisted to the great election fraud actually ; as la; the Party, charging it with the same crime, while its and loaders were or in

November 5, 1882, New York Times, MR. M'KEON'S ELECTION BUREAU.; WHERE ALLEGED FRAUDULENT VOTERS WERE DISCOVERED,
Court for a mean theft of and money, in which a poor girl named Hattie I? was the victim, heard of \I r. s weakness for election fraud sensations and had the information that he was to disclose a t; schemo of election frauds in au

January 31, 1883, New York Times, NO EVIDENCE TO SUSTAIN THE CHARGES, of a material witness, and as the defendants demand a trial the may be discharged." So ends another of the of alleged election fraud, about so great a fuss was made before .

March 6, 1883, New York Times, THE RECORD OF CRIME, the election fraud Ink of thy Grand Jury, and that q number of names have been added to the List; The action of the officer! leads credence to the report that lions have been received from the Department Olt Justice concerning the

March 22, 1883, New York Times, LOUISIANA ELECTION FRAUDS, The election fraud case against George W. G: , Caspar Glaser, and Owen Short, of the Filth Precinct of the ninth Ward, eras continued to-day in the United States District Court."

March 28, 1883, New York Times, LOUISIANA ELECTION FRAUDS, March 2i.-The election fraud cases worn resumed to-day, a large crowd being present. A number of witnesses were examined, many of whom had registered but did not vote, their name. were on the returns

March 29, 1883, New York Times, LOUISIANA ELECTION FRAUDS, NEW-ORLEANS, March 28.--In the election fraud case which has been on trial here the jury to-day returned a verdict of not guilty. The other cases were indefinitely postponed.

April 12, 1883, New York Times, MR. CROWLEY ANNOYED.; HIS RELATIONS WITH THE ADMINISTRATION VERY PLEASANT, Crowley was asked by a reporter to-day to give his reasons for withdrawing from the prosecution of the South Carolina election fraud cases, his withdrawal having caused unfavorable

April 14, 1883, New York Times, Deeds Of Evil-Doer; Testimony Against SCHELLER--PHIPPS IN PHILADELPHIA--PACKER CONVICTED. 000 ball for S50 from J. J. Noah by means of a bogus check on the Manhattan Bank (t. -ORLEANS, April 13.-The jury in the election fraud case against , Donovan, and Rankin, before the United States Court to-day, returned a verdict of

March 18, 1884, New York Times, Editorial Article 4 -- No Title, Democrats in the House of Representatives should go to the trouble of maturing bills to impede the course of justice in election fraud cases, when they know that cannot become law, and when their real motive is sure to be . The

March 18, 1884, New York Times, A DEMOCRATIC SCHEME KILLED,
voice of the majority is ~;. The law passed by the Fort:-sixth Congress in relation to the manner of up jury lists in election fraud cases has practically operated to fill the boy from :~ i:icfi names of are drawn fir ith active"

May 15, 1884, New York Times, NEW-JERSEY FOR TILDEN; PROCEEDINGS OF THE DEMOCRATIC STATE CONVENTION. THE OLD TICKET ENTHUSIASTICALLY INDORSED--GOV. ABBETT TO HEAD THE DELEGATION TO CHICAGO, the Democratic Party to the people, that his course would be marked by wisdom, economy and reform. That we believe that election fraud of 18i0 and .1R77, by which Samuel J. t fides and A. Hendrlcks were cheated out of the offices

November 22, 1884, New York Times, HELPED BY HIS PRISONER.; A LUCKY OFFICER TAKES TWO CAPTIVES TO COURT INSTEAD OF ONE,
States Deputy Marshal A.L. Smith has been looking for Conrad Lutz, a Chatham-street baker, who is wanted for aiding in an election fraud on Nov. 4. With a number of other Ger

December 28, 1884, New York Times, THE CHICAGO ELECTION FRAUDS,
CHICAGO, Dec. 27.--William J. Gallagher, the present "star" in the election fraud cases, appeared before Justice Lyon to-day to answer to a cargo of illegal voting preferred by A.M. Day, Secretary ...THE CHICAGO ELECTION FRAUDS. of

January 8, 1885, New York Times, THE CHICAGO BALLOT BOX FRAUDS,
request made that tho ease ho set for trial as early as possible. Mho Cook County Grand Jury for December took up tho election fraud cases, but had only examined a fow witnesses when their term expired. They recommended that the

January 8, 1885, New York Times, LOGAN ANXIOUS TO SUCCEED HIMSELF, permanent, but ho would express no as to the final outcome of the contort. Ho emphatically denied the story that the >,; election fraud `car to ho used us a lever to induce Democrats to vote for biro, and said ho would not accept

January 28, 1885, New York Times, HE THRASHED THE REPORTER, CHICAGO, Jan. 27.--The election fraud trouble is taking on a new phase, and has now developed into the fisticuff stage. Peter Hansbrough, clerk of the North Side Police Court and one of the indicted Election Judges in the...HE

February 6, 1885, New York Times, ON TRIAL FOR ELECTION FRAUDS,
CHICAGO, Feb. 5.--The trial of the Eighteenth Ward election fraud cases, wherein Joseph C. Mackin, William J. Gallagher, Arthur Gleason, and Henry Biehl are defendants, was commenced this morning in the United States District Court,

February 17, 1885, New York Times, ONE OF JOE MACKIN'S WITNESSES,
CHICAGO, Feb. 16.--Jeremiah J. Sullivan, the alleged printer who gave such remarkable testimony for the defendants in the election fraud conspiracy trial as to cause the lodgment against him of an information charging perjury,

May 19, 1885, New York Times, THE CHICAGO ELECTION FRAUDS,
begun to-day in the United States District Court, before Justice Harian and Judge Gresham, in the famous Mackin-Gallagher election fraud case, on the motion of the defendants for a writ of error. The arguments may be finished

June 6, 1885, New York Times, THE CHICAGO ELECTION CASES,
Charles E. Gilman and Jeremiah J. Sullivan for perjury ...committed during the celebrated election fraud trial. They were the witnesses for the defense who sworn they had been engaged in printing the

June 9, 1885, New York Times, CHICAGO'S ELECTION FRAUDS.; JUDGE TURPIE AND OTHERS IMPLICATED BY A PRISONER'S CONFESSION,
Sullivan, has been lately indicted by the Federal Grand Jury for perjury commisted in testifying for the defense in the city election fraud case last February, has made

July 24, 1885, New York Times, TRYING TO SAVE MACKIN, case of Joseph C. Mackin, sentenced to five years in the penitentiary for perjury in connection with the Eighteenth Ward election fraud. The Judges declined to admit Mackin to bail, and he will remain in jail until the matter is

September 5, 1885, New York Times, JOSEPH C. MACKIN'S CASE, Court this morning overruled the motion for a continuance in the case of Joseph C. Mackin, convicted of perjury in the election fraud cases. It was urged that as was under a sentence in the United Court a

March 21, 1986, New York Times, TO REFORM POLITICS.; THE WORK OF THE HARRISBURG COMMITTEE OF ONE HUNDRED, HARRISBURG, Penn., March 20.--The Citizens Committee of One Hundred, which met and organized about one month ago, held another meeting at the Court House to-day. A constitution was submitted and adopted. The preamble states that the objects of the committee are to maintain the purity of the ballot, to nomination and election of 8 better cress op candidates for , to prosecute and bring to punishment those who have been of election fraud, mal- ef office, or . trot! of publ(o funds; to prevent ob3 and aid in as the pub. 1#e welfare

December 18, 1886, New York Times, THE INDIANA FRAUD CASES,
INDIANAPOLIS, Dec. 17.--In the election fraud case to-day Inspector Hiser, who testified two days ago that his tally sheet was taken by Samuel E. Perkins, a local Democratic striker, and kept 20 minutes, to-day testified that it was

December 19, 1886, New York Times, INDIANA ELECTION FRAUDS; INVESTIGATING THE ALTERED TALLY SHEETS. DEMOCRATIC INSPECTOR TESTIFIES TO CHANGES MADE IN THE PAPERS AFTER LEAVING HIS HANDS, INDIANAPOLIS, Dec. 18.--In the election fraud case this morning the most important testimony yet given came out. The precinct in which the largest changes were made on the tally sheet, with the object of counting out two legislative

December 21, 1886, New York Times, AN OBSTINATE WITNESS.; WHO REFUSES TO TESTIFY IN THE INDIANA FRAUD CASES, Dec. 20.--This morning in Commissioner Van Buren's room Mr. Samuel E. Perkins, the witness who refused to testify in the election fraud case on the ground of jurisdiction, appeared by counsel, Hendricks, ...AN OBSTINATE WITNESS. WHO

December 22, 1886, New York Times, PERKINS IN CONTEMPT.; A WITNESS IN THE INDIANA FRAUD CASES LOCKED UP, INDIANAPOLIS, Dec. 21.--When Commissioner Van Buren opened the hearing of the election fraud case this morning Samuel E. Perkins was called to the stand. He appeared, and when asked if he still refused to testify he said that he

February 18, 1887, New York Times, THE ABBETT FORCE AHEAD; MESSRS. WALTER AND TURLEY VOTED INTO SEATS. THE DEMOCRATS HOWL AND THE REPUBLICANS FILIBUSTER, BUT THE FRAUDS WIN JUST THE SAME, despised him, lest he condemn his o:vn party, which exulted is the possession of flits fellow s crime. In 1885 a daring election fraud was perpetrated in Camden County, whereby it was attempted to in a Democratic County Clerk. The

April 10, 1887, New York Times, MICHIGAN ELECTION FRAUD; THE PROHIBITION AMENDMENT LOST BY TRICKERY. WHOLESALE IMPORTATION OF VOTERS FROM WISCONSIN BY THE ANTIPROHIBITIONISTS, the prohibition vote in this State, and steadily reducing the opposing vote which the large cities had piled up.MICHIGAN

April 29, 1887, New York Times, INDICTED FOR ELECTION FRAUDS,
ST. LOUIS, April 28.--The United States Grand Jury returned 13 indictments in the election fraud cases today ator F, H. . Congressional Committeeman James Cat roil et-de. to the Peter k, ^ James , and

May 4, 1887, New York Times, INDIANA ELECTION FRAUDS.; A NEW GRAND JURY TO INVESTIGATE THEM,
custody far an evidently improper purpose. The was in the nature of an entire ,'i;.nd has given a new and interest to the election fraud oases. In the State court the Assistant Prosecuting Attorney to-day filed a the Judge ie

November 5, 1887, New York Times, NOT SUFFICIENT FACTS,
Albany County, and Police Officer James McGuirk, of Cohoes, who were yesterday on a charge of conspiring... to commit en election fraud, were dl6 by corder 6 in c this morning, tt held that the affidavit on 'which the arrests wore

November 23, 1887, New York Times, THE ALBANY ELECTION FRAUD,
fraudulent returns. These offenses have not been confined to the politicians of one party, but the Democrats ...have been more conspicuous for their efforts in that direction than the Republicans, and on

December 13, 1887, New York Times, HONEST CITIZENS PUZZLED.; WHY IS NOT ACTION TAKEN IN THE ELECTION FRAUD MATTER?, City Reform Club, is puzzling the wits of all honest citizens. of citizens, acting from d?(1 , employed a corps of , two before the last election, lo

December 14, 1887, New York Times, HIS EXCUSE FOR INACTION MR. MARTINE'S CONDUCT SHARPLY CRITICISED.; FRIENDS OF HONEST ELECTIONS CANNOT UNDERSTAND WHY HE DOES NOT SEEK TO PUNISH FRAUD, the of the offenders and the witnesses and what they would testify to from any one. "In the election fraud cases of 1883, 1884, and 1885 the same rere sad as in Ei>;nth Assembly District cases and lart, ey

March 2, 1888, New York Times, ALL DENY THE CONSPIRACY, LANCASTER, Penn., March 1.--The defense in the ward election fraud case was opened today, and the five defendants were placed on the stand. boon any conspiracy to defraud the electors or or .there had neon

March 25, 1888, New York Times, CITY AND SUBURBAN NEWS.; NEW-YORK. BROOKLYN. WESTCHESTER COUNTY., at Quarantine yesterday, as sue had a case of sm> on board. Tlie present Grand Jury on Monday will examine some of the election fraud witnesses with a view to a being made un the subject. suffering from were sent to North Brother

May 15, 1888, New York Times, SUPREME COURT OPINIONS; A REHEARING IN THE TELEPHONE CASES DENIED.WRITS OF HABEAS CORPUS REFUSED IN THE PATTI TICKET SWINDLE--WESTERN UNION TAXES, opinion ; the application of Coy and Bernhamer for a writ of hatless corpus. These cases are as the Indian tally sheet election fraud ca::e3. and ;;raw out of frauds to havo hoan committed in Marion County, IacZ. in the election

June 13, 1888, New York Times, FELLOWS HURRYING HOME.; ALIVE TO THE RESULTS OF HIS NEGLIGENCE--A TALK WITH HIM, assured him that several members of the staff of the District Attorney's had been detailed to net up bho testimony in the election fraud and Aldermanio boodle cases, and present it to the Grand Jury. They promised him that there

June 15, 1888, New York Times, COL. FELLOWS'S NEGLECT.; A QUESTION OF VERACITY WIHT JUDGE BARRETT, Jury unless he lied evidence to render a conviction. I called the Grand Jury, after with Col. Fellows, to consider the election fraud oases primarily, then the Aldermanic oases, and neat any other business that might comp : It was

October 24, 1888, New York Times, ACCUSED OF ELECTION FRAUD,
precinct of the Second District in Jersey City last Spring, was placed on trial in the Hudson County Court of…

December 18, 1888, New York Times, TO PROSECUTE DUDLEY.; THE SUCCESSOR OF MR. SELLERS AS UNITED STATES DISTRICT ATTORNEY, tally-sheet frauds to conviction, has bean appointed by Attorney-Ganert:l Garland lift. Bailey's assistant in tlic present election fraud cases.

November 20, 1889, New York Times, ELECTION FRAUDS CHARGED,
TROY, Nov. 19.--The contested election case in the Sixth Ward in this city came up before Justice Edwards of the Supreme Court this morning on an application for a writ of mandamus directed to the Board of County Canvassers, ......

January 21, 1890, New York Times, WITHOUT EVEN A BLUSH; SPOILS HUNTERS ATTACKING THE REFORM. HATTON AND FRIENDS SURPRISED THAT THE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION COURTS INVESTIGATION, wore some irregularities there, the Senator -- to ir. Chandler -- had been one of the principal agents in the Florida election fraud in 1876, the demoralization resulting from which had no entirely 0 The allusion to his course in

January 26, 1890, New York Times, THE BALLOT-BOX FRAUD.; IMPORTANT TESTIMONY IN THE NEW-BRUNSWICK TRIAL, NEW-BRUNSWICK, N.J., Jan. 25. -- Some important testimony was introduced to-day in the election fraud trial pointing to the guilt of at least two of the men accused of robbing the ballot box -- Hayter and Tenneson. These men admit

April 7, 1890, New York Times, READY TO FIGHT THE RING; MR. PERKINS'S PROSPECTS ARE GROWING BRIGHT. NUMBERS ARE ABANDONING THE CLEVELAND RANKS -- ASSESSMENT LEVIED ON THE BENEFICIARIES, entire afternoon, and conspicuous among them was Trotter himself, apparently not at all disheartened by hs arrest for election fraud In the Fourth District the ring managers found their services imperatively in demand yesterday.

March 20, 1891, New York Times, NORTH CAROLINA POLITICS; FEDERAL PATRONAGE HURTS THE REPUBLICANS. CONSERVATIVE ELEMENTS MANAGE TO HEAD OFF SOME WILD ALLIANCE SCHEMES -- THE NEGRO AND THE FEAR OF HIS DOMINATION, conducting State affairs. The belief prevails widely among intelligent and reputable men that to prevent negro domination election fraud is JustrflflDle. This is evidently due largely to prejudice, for in the counties where the

February 21, 1892, New York Times, DISTRICT CONVENTIONS.; HILL'S MAN KIRK CARRIES THROUGH HIS SLATE IN ONONDAGA,
Third Ward; W. H. Tapnan, Baldwinsville, and oo Yank " Sullivan, Fourth Ward. .Second District-Robert T. Dorchester of election fraud fame, Patrick Slattery, Fifth Ward, and John Daley. Sixth Ward. Third District-M. K. .Dyer,

April 19, 1892, New York Times, THE BAY STATE DEMOCRATS; OVERWHELMINGLY IN FAVOR OF CLEVELAND. THE DELEGATES TO CHICAGO ALREADY CHOSEN ARE ALMOST UNANIMOUSLY FOR THE EX-PRESIDENT -- FALSE RE- PORTS CORRECTED, and 12 and Iti. make up the greater portion of the district, are famous for election lights, ballot-box stuffing, ami of election fraud s. It is a distinctively Hill bailiwick. Joslab . Chairman of the Executive Committee ol the

July 23, 1892, New York Times, M'KINLEY A PHILANTHROPIST.; A FACT ABOUT THE TARIFF HITHERTO NOT KNOWN BY THE PEOPLE,
were directed to stand up. " You wish, I understand," \V infield said to them, " to retract your plea of not guilty to election fraud, and to plead guilty? " " We do," the four responded in chorus. Thou tho pleas of guilty were

August 8, 1892, New York Times, WORK BEFORE DEMOCRATS; THE CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE TO GET INTO SHAPE. IT IS TO ORGANIZE TO-DAY AT SARATOGA -- THE PLAN OF CAMPAIGN WILL ALSO BE DISCUSSED -- THERE IS A HARD FIGHT IN VIEW FOR THE CONTROL OF THE LEGISLATURE, maintain that Gov. Hill must be vindicated for choosing Maynard aa the counsel for the Democratic State Committee in the election fraud causes and Gov. Flower for nominating him for Associate Justice. Maycard himself, they also

December 4, 1892, New York Times, The Water Meter Took a Jump.; The Amendments Probably Lost. Dismembered by the Machinery. Election Fraud in Providence,

December 31, 1892, New York Times, BUFFALO ELECTION FRAUDS.; THE GRAND JURY FINDS FOUR MORE INDICTMENTS, BUFFALO, N.Y., Dec. 30. -- The Superior Court Grand Jury, which for several weeks has been considering election fraud cases, this afternoon presented indictments against Alderman William Summers of the Fifth Ward, Julius Haas of the

February 10, 1893, New York Times, COLUMBIA COLLEGE THEATRICALS.; THE SEASON OPENED WITH TWO AMUSING PLAYS,
8:30 o'clock and to-morrow afternoon at 2 o'clock. Mujrsaa Kleotlon Fraud Hearing. BUFFALO, N. T., Fob. 9.-The Duggan election fraud was resumed this morning. The proceedings have become tedious and interest is diminishing. Lieut.

February 15, 1893, New York Times, Duggan Election Fraud Case.; Congressman Causey's Condition, N. Y., Feb. 14.-Ift the Dnggan election fraud trial this morning Congressman Lookwood began summing up for the defense. He "was followed by Spenoor Clinton for the prosecution. Judge

February 16, 1893, New York Times, A SHADOW FACE ON THE PILLOW.; MANY PEOPLE AT NEWPORT BELIEVE THEY HAVE SEEN A MIRACLE,
the streets with their father, and much interest is centred in them. N. Y.. Feb. 15.-The jury in the case of James Duggan, the Election Inspector with

October 19, 1893, New York Times, BEWARE! NO ELECTION FRAUD; BROOKLYN BOSSES ARE DESPERATE AND ALSO UNSCRUPULOUS. Trickery Has Been Done Before -- It May Be Attempted This Fall -- "Boss" McLaughlin Worried and Alarmed -- Republicans and Independents Confident of Mr. Schieren's Election -- Vigorous Campaign to be Prosecuted -- Mass Meetings to be Hold -- Women to Work, the Republican reform candidate for Mayor, means more than a change in the Municipal Government of Brooklyn.

November 15, 1893, New York Times, M' KANE'S PROSECUTORS NAMED; GOV. FLOWER RESPONDS TO MR. GAYNOR'S APPLICATION. He Names as Special Prosecutors Edward M. Shepard, a Reform Democrat, and Ex-Judge George G. Reynolds, a Reform Republican -- The Selections Suit All Good Brooklyn Citizens -- Judge Reynolds May Not Be Able to Accept -- Letter from Ex-Grand Juror Adams, for the appointment of "one or more special prosecuting officers" to assist in she preparation and prosecution of the election fraud oases in Brooklyn, and Kings County

November 18, 1893, New York Times, GOV. FLOWER IN EARNEST,
upon a pathway that would have to be retraced. For this reason it is fortunate that Mr. EDWARD M. . before taking up the election-fraud cases, discovered not only that his authority under the law by which he was appointed would be

November 23, 1893, New York Times, M'KANE IN VARIOUS ROLES; DENIES, THREATENS, AND TALKS OF GOOD OLD TIMES. His Blind Son Never a Paid Police Sergeant -- Will Sue New-York Papers for Libel -- Speaks Fondly of Days When He Drove with His Revolver in Hand and Knocked Men Down -- Others Preparing for His Role in Court,
necessary that a. fund of $23,000 should be raised immediately to assist Gen. Tracy and Edward M. Shepard in prosecuting the election-fraud cases. Before adjourning the committee selected Col. Albert E L,amb to assist Gen. Tracy and

December 3, 1893, New York Times, FOR CITY WORKS COMMISSIONER.; Alfred T. White Said to Have Been Selected by Mr. Schieren,
Commissioner of Jurors, in the Kings County Court House. Justice Cullen, who is to preside over the court at -which the election fraud cases are to be tried/ presided at the drawing. He was assisted by Justice Clement of the City

December 5, 1893, New York Times, THE ELECTION FRAUD CASES,
special purpose of considering cases of alleged frauds at the recent election and of violations of the excise laws.THE ELECTION FRAUD CASES, In charging this jury -with reference to its powers and duties, Judge BA. dwelt upon the

December 15, 1893, New York Times, M'Kane, Thirty Days Jail; JUSTICE BARNARD ALSO FINES HIM $250 FOR CONTEMPT. Justice Newton and Inspectors Johnson, Crandall, and Cropsey to Receive Similar Punishment -- The Court Says the Evidence Clearly Shows an Intention to Perpetrate Fraud, at Gravesend -- The Condemned Men Will Seek a Stay, the bar "Wednesday night. Jere A. Wernberg, who is assisting Gen. Tracy and Edward M. Shepard in the prosecution of the election-fraud cases, went to Poughkeepsie at midnight. He will return this morning -with the order of arrest

December 20, 1893, New York Times, ELECTION FRAUD INQUIRY BEGUN.; The Extraordinary Grand Jury Examines the Gravesend Clerk, The extraordinary Grand Jury convened in Brooklyn for the purpose of inquiring into the alleged frauds in that city and in Kings County at the resent election began its labors yesterday....

December 28, 1893, New York Times, PARKHURST AND INSPECTOR WILLIAMS.; Charges Before the Extraordinary Grand Jury Against the "High Official", hearing the witnesses, adjourned until Friday, and transacted no other business, save some details connected with the election-fraud cases. All that was to be offered against Inspector Williams, it was said, had been put in

December 28, 1893, New York Times, Caught The Ex-Policeman; Lally Charged With Illegal Electioneering. Forty-nine of the Election-Fraud Cases Considered in the Court of Oyer and Terminer -- Accused Men Enter a Plea of Not Guilty, Some of Them Asking Leave to Withdraw It and Present a Demurrer Next Month,

December 29, 1893, New York Times, LALLY WITHOUT HIS SWAGGER; BUT HE SUCCEEDS IS HAVING HIS BAIL REDUCED. The District Attorney Consents to Having It towered to $1,000, and He Obtains a Bondsman -- Thirty-one Men Held on Indictments for Election. Frauds-One Changes His Plea of Guilty -- A Tombs Keeper Objects to a Reduction in His Bail,
Justice Barrett had a busy time of it yesterday in the Court of Oyer and Terminer with the election fraud cases. Thirty-one men, of whom fourteen had previously obtained bail, filed before the bar to plead to charges of violation of

December 30, 1893, New York Times, M'Kane Among The Indicted.; The Kings County Extraordinary Grand Jury to Report To-day, make to the court as soon as he has been indicted. The Grand Jury to be convened in the month of January will take up the election fraud cases in the City of Brooklyn. Justice Haggerty will also be taken care of for his action in

January 4, 1894, New York Times, Albany Election-Fraud Cases, Jan. 3.-Three of the cases instituted by the Reform Committee of Fifty, to punish \ of

January 6, 1894, New York Times, Brutally Whipped by Five Men.; Swindled Through Bogus Coal Orders. Great Honors to Maurice Jokai. Albany Election-Fraud Case Decided. Senator Lindsay Renominated. Scarlet Fever in Mount Vernon,

January 14, 1894, New York Times, KINGS COUNTY ELECTION FRAUDS.; Jamison Indicted Again -- McKane Opposed to Change of Venue, Election Brownhill, Morris, and Ryan will be called for trial. The present Extraordinary Grand Jury Is investigating the election-fraud cases in Brooklyn. It has taken into consideration the case of a Police Justice who was very

January 17, 1894, New York Times, Editorial Article 2 -- No Title
Assistant District Attorney Wellman, has charge of the election-fraud cases, which he desires to bring- to a trial during the February term of the Court of Over and Terminer, is quoted as that he is receiving no assistance from the

February 7, 1894, New York Times, NEVILLE AND COUNSEL LATE; JUSTICE BARRETT GIVES A WARNING TO LAWYER SCHAMPAIN. Interesting Developments In an Election-Fraud Case -- Neville Charged with Destroying Independent and Saving Democratic Ballots -- Strange Discrepancy in Two Counts -- Accused Inspector Testifies in His Own Behalf -- A Surprise,

February 13, 1894, New York Times, Editorial Article 2 -- No Title
Congressional jurisdiction of the matter. Assistant District Attorney "Wellman is finding- some of the witnesses in the election fraud cases suddenly afflicted with a remarkable loss of memory as to facts which they had previously

February 15, 1894, New York Times, PRESIDENT BLAUT ON TRIAL; MADISON SQUARE BANK OFFICER BEFORE THE BAR. He Is Charged with Perjury, It Being Alleged that He Swore to a False Statement Respecting the Condition of the Institution -- Talesmen Closely Examined by the Prosecution and Defense -- Ten Jurors Selected to Serve in the Case, false. The -work; of getting a jury was begun immediately after Justice Barrett had Imposed the sentences in three of the election fraud cases. Mr. Blaut's interests are being looked after by Edward Lauterbach and his partner, Jacob

February 28, 1894, New York Times, VOTES COUNTED ALL ONE WAY; DOOLEY FOUND GUILTY OF MAKING A FALSE CANVASS. Indicated Election Officers Give Testimony in Favor of the Accused -- Prosecution Vigorously Pushing the Cases Against Those Indicted for Fraud -- About Fifty More Trials to be Brought Before Justice Barrett in Oyer and Terminer, More of the election-fraud cases came before Justice Barrett, in the Court of Oyer and Terminer, yesterday. Out of the seventy-four indictments originally found, two-thirds of the trials yet remain to be heard.

March 1, 1894, New York Times, THE ELECTION-FRAUD CASES, Thus far in the election-fraud cases in this city four Inspectors of Election have been convicted of criminal violations of the law they were sworn to execute faithfully, four other persons have been convicted of fraudulent

March 17, 1894, New York Times, Editorial Article 2 -- No Title, The course of the Attorney General of the State in declining to take charge of the Troy election fraud cases, under the condition imposed by Gov. Flower, that he should appoint as his deputy the Assistant District Attorney of

April 5, 1894, New York Times, BI-PARTISAN POLICE BILL; PASSED BY A PARTY VOTE IN THE SENATE. New-York City Politicians in Force Watch the Proceedings -- Senator Cantor Opposes the Measure Without Avail -- Quite Certain to be Adopted by the Assembly -- The Compulsory Education Bill Goes Over for Action, were made special orders for. Thursday morning. The next: special order was Senator Saxton's resolution giving the election-fraud, investigating committee power to investigate Police (Departments, in all the cities of the

April 8, 1894, New York Times, Says The Times Was Right, - THOMAS W. STEVENS here has o. -never been a defalcation of any of its officers, aad its bonds sell higher than any city in the State. Election, fraud has always been in Albany, as well as in all other cities; both 'parties have practiced it, arid I

April 22, 1894, New York Times, Want Pay for Gravesend Prosecutions Tracy, and Jerry A. Wernberg, who have applied for compensation for their services in the prosecution of the Gravesend election fraud cases.Want Pay for Gravesend Prosecutions. No opposition -was made to the application, but

May 18, 1894, New York Times, DEPOSITOR SULLIVAN APPEARED.; Mary Must Return to Bleecker Street Savings Bank the Money She Received,
the papers signed by Justice Gaynor, to collect the fees allowed them for their services in prosecuting the Gravesend election-fraud cases. Deputy Treasurer Harrington said that an examination of the funds had been made, and all

June 1, 1894, New York Times, TEN INSPECTORS PLEAD GUILTY.; Staten Island Election-Fraud Trials Brought to a Sudden End., and counsel for the defendants entered a plea before Justice Cullen for mercy. Every preparation had been made to continue the trials, and the

June 27, 1894, New York Times, HORSE-BOLOGNA MAKER IN JAIL.; Bosse Will Have a Chance to Regret that He Defied Authority, While awaiting- arraignment, he sat in the same chair so often occupied by his victim while acting as counsel in the election fraud cases. o Bartholomew's father, deeply agitated, sat near the prisoner.

September 14, 1894, New York Times, CONVICTED OF REPEATING IN TROY.; Michael Pillion Sentenced to One Year-Charges of Dilatory Prosecution, Prosecution. Pillion's conviction is the first in twenty years that a jury in Rensselaer County has found, in a case of election fraud. Immediately after the sentence of Pillion, District Attorney Kelly stated that he had nothing

September 30, 1894, New York Times, DISSATISFIED WITH THE TICKET.; Brooklyn Democrats Condemn the Nomination of Senator Hill, logical candidate for Judge of the Court of Appeals on such a ticket at the side of those who approved and condoned the election fraud would be that thief of election returns, Isaac H. Maynard. That the nomination of David B. Hill

November 24, 1894, New York Times, GOFF RETURNS TO TOWN; What He Says of the Plans of the Lexow Committee. ANNOYED WITH A TICKET AVALANCHE The Recorder-Elect Will Conduct the Senate Investigation Until the End of the Year -- Appeal in the Gardner Case, associates for the removal of District Attorney John R. Fellows or the reiterated refusal of Gov. Flower to place the election fraud prosecutions in the hands of a Deputy Attorney General. " I am not familiar enough with the subject

November 26, 1894, New York Times, MONEY OFFERED TO MR. WELLMAN; FRIENDS OF CRIMINALS WANTED TO BUY INFORMATION. Some Interesting Election Fraud Cases Which the Committee of Seventy Wishes to Prosecute at Once, would not accept the place. Mr. Wellman, in an interview

December 4, 1894, New York Times, AIMED DIRECTLY AT KOLB; A Bill Proposed to Make His Action Punishable with Imprisonment, Senator Goodwyn, a leading Populist, said tonight: " I hope the bill will become law. TVe want an Investigation of the election fraud, and Ko!b will at once proceed to violate it, and at his trial the facts will have to be brought

December 29, 1894, New York Times, NO PARDON FOR SUTHERLAND; Gov. Flower Says Purity of the Ballot Must Be Preserved -- A Blow for State Senator Sullivan, Gov. Flower heard the application, and then said that he had made up his mind to pardon no man who had been convicted of election fraud. " The purity of elections has got to be maintained," he said, " and in order to enforce this

December 4, 1895, New York Times, CITY CLERK ARRESTED; Murphy of Long Island City Is Accused of Election Fraud. ELECTION INSPECTOR ALSO ACCUSED Murphy Gave a Certificate of Election to Madden -- Charges that the Figures Were Changed, are charged with willful violations of the election laws.

December 11, 1895, New York Times, DOCTOR ACCUSED OF ELECTION FRAUD; Said to Live in Lawrence and to Have Voted in Far Rockaway, FAR ROCKAWAY, L.I., Dec. 10. -Dn J. Carl Sehmuek of this place has been arrested on a charge of having voted illegally at the local

February 27, 1896, New York Times, OBITUARY RECORD, redistrict the town, but subsequently the indictment was quashed, as It was shown that he 'had not been guilty of any election fraud. Frederick A. Platt. Frederick A. Platt, a well-known New Yorker at the time of the war and. the

November 24, 1896, New York Times, SUFFRAGE AND ELECTION FRAUDS, Are matters which should concern Democrats quite as much as the citizens whose votes are wrongfully manipulated. Every election fraud, no matter by whom committed, is a blow at the rights of citizenship, and is a sin against

March 20, 1897, New York Times, KNAUER CLAIMS HE IS SANE.; By an Alleged Conspiracy He Has Been in an Asylum for Years,

June 27, 1897, New York Times, ELECTION FRAUD IN CHICAGO, June 27. -- Adolph Freese, J. J. }{anl ahan, and Patrick Ferris, the three election judges of the Fifteenth l of the Seventeenth Vard who acted at the last municipal ,., ,vere to tile Grand

November 6, 1897, New York Times, ELECTION FRAUD CHARGED; Citizens' Union Men Say They Have Ample Proof in the Nineteenth Assembly District. STEWART WILL MAKE A FIGHT Boudinot Keith Says the Poll Officers Were Repeatedly Warned that They Were Violating the Law -Rumored Tammany Offers, Assemblyman in the Nineteenth as follows: Weil, (Dem.,) 3,665; Stewart, (Citizens' Union,)' 3,583; Mazet, (Rep.,) 3,147.

October 20, 1898, New York Times, DANFORTH,
fined by the Supreme Court of this State for aiding as a member of the State Board of Canvassers irt the of an election fraud, and he has never since shown the slightest sign of repentance for that crime.

Inappropriate Ululation At Minimum.



The kind-hearted and noble Canadian. The evolved and civilized Jew and/or Israeli---their fortunes generations removed from cattle, oil or whatnot. But the Palestinian Arab! Inappropriately ululating!









Texas Rangers





File:Txrangers3.jpg
Texas Rangers gathered at El Paso to stop the illegal Maher–Fitzsimmons fight, 1896. At the front row from the left are Adj. General W Mabry, and Capts. J Hughes, J Brooks, Bill McDonald (coiner of the phrase) and J Rogers.

Rare Bonnie and Clyde film footage, 05:43https://youtu.be/hzNntWE16xo
Bonnie and Clyde






















Hey You! Do you wanna get what Clyde Barrow got? Well then, just keep it up...










Photos Kleberg, King Ranch
















































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Precinct 13



 Jim Wells county next door.




http://www.co.duval.tx.us/default.aspx?name=Election











https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Wells_County,_Texas
Jim Wells County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 40,838.[1] Its county seat is Alice.[2] The county was founded in 1911[3]
75.71% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.
Alice originated from the defunct community of Collins, three miles to the east. Around 1880 the San Antonio and Aransas Pass Railway attempted to build a line through Collins, which then had about 2,000 inhabitants. The townspeople were not amenable to selling their land to the railroad company; consequently, the railroad site was moved three miles west, and in 1883 a depot called Bandana was established at its junction with the Corpus Christi, San Diego and Rio Grande Railway. Bandana soon became a thriving cattle-shipping point, and application for a post office was made under the name Kleberg in honor of Robert Justus Kleberg. The petition was denied because a town named Kleberg already appeared on the post office list, so residents then chose the name Alice, in honor of Alice Gertrudis King Kleberg, Kleberg's wife and the daughter of Richard King. 


Robert Justus Kleberg, Jr. (December 5, 1853 – October 10, 1932)[1] was born to Rose and Robert J. Kleberg[2] in Texas[1] and attended the University of Virginia.[1] He served as legal counsel to Richard King and his 600,000-acre (2,400 km2King Ranch. When King died, Kleberg took over the management of the ranch in 1885.[2] Under his tenure the ranch grew to encompass over 1,300,000 acres (5,300 km2).[1] He also encouraged the B. F. Yoakum company of St. Louis to build a railroad in South Texas.[3] Eventually oil was discovered under much of this cattle country. His son Richard M. Kleberg had recently been elected to the U.S. House of Representatives (in 1931), which was mentioned in Time magazine issue of 17 October 1932 which reported the elder Kleberg's death.

American Business Leaders of the Twentieth Century - Kleberg, Robert Justus, Sr. (sic),  www.hbs.edu: Harvard University.

The Handbook of Texas Online - Kleberg, Robert Justus (father's van Kleef, Alisa Robert Justus Kleberg II,  In Immigrant Entrepreneurship: German-American Business Biographies, 1720 to the Present, vol. 3, edited by Giles R. Hoyt. German Historical Institute.2015.entry, www.tshaonline.org: The Texas State Historical Association



Robert Justus Kleberg







SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2010
Speaking of All-Time Great Election Frauds!
Archer Parr, (1860-1942) established himself as the “boss” of Duval County, Texas. Archer eventually passed his political kingdom on to his son, George B. Parr. Together, they became known as the “Dukes of Duval.”

The elder Duke (Archer) was elected county commissioner and rose in the ranks of the Democratic Party after a prominent tax collector met a shotgun blast. The poor fellow had unwisely chosen to eat lunch, in the middle of the day, in a public restaurant. With a power vacuum to exploit, Parr immediately undertook the business of bribing voters, inflating voting turnout statistics and, if necessary, creating voters and votes. In 1914, he won a seat in the state Senate, but soon found himself under the eye of investigators. Parr was re-elected in 1918 when Duval County provided him with thirteen hundred votes and a one hundred and eighteen vote victory. The sheer closeness of the race was stressful in itself, but the cynics were overly occupied by the seemingly trivial fact that Duval County had less than a thousand eligible voters.

Young George, or “B,” as his family called him) attended several colleges before graduating and moved on to the University of Texas Law School. He wound up passing the state bar exam without a degree. After spending some time driving his father around and selling real estate, George landed a position as Duvall County judge in 1926 (replacing his own brother). The new position appeared to make him the logical successor of Archer. But life soon got complex for “B.”


In late 1931, a federal investigator visited George and asked questions about some cancelled checks. George’s response (if he is to be believed) was to simply blurt, “I don’t give a goddamn who you are or where you are from, you don’t interest me. I am busy right now.” On March 9, 1932, a federal grand jury (with a little more time for the investigator) indicted George for income tax evasion. The honorable judge found himself accused of having failed to report $25,000 that he had received from a highway contractor and $17,000 from other sources. After more than a few delays, he plead “guilty” on May 21, 1934, and, on May 23, was sentenced to two years in prison. Judge R.J. McMillan also hit Parr with a $5,000. Under the plea agreement, however, the two-year sentence was “suspended.” So, George would simply have to pay the fine and remain under supervised probation.

Judge McMillan warned Parr to “stay out of politics” and “behave” himself but, on June 3, 1936, Parr’s probation was revoked. He was a mere eight days from the end of the assigned two-year period when a U.S. Attorney accused him of physically assaulting a State Representative, committing fraud in an oil and gas lease, having ownership in a company that distributed alcohol illegally, accepting illegal payoffs from gamblers and failing to report to his probation officer. It was not stated whether all of these things were discovered at once, or some sort of breaking point had finally been reached. On July 19, Parr was sent to a reformatory in El Reno, Oklahoma where he stayed until May 6, 1937. He was then paroled and, finally, discharged on January 9, 1938.