Sunday, September 23, 2012

Radulan Sahiron


Why did United States authorities "freeze the assets" of Radulan Sahiron on November 30, 2005,1 and why were they and the Philippine authorities still on the lookout for him (while offering a five--million peso  reward for his capture) as late as 2010 (when apparently, he'd be almost an octogenarian) while this Associated Press article from 1994, says---quoting Lt. Gen. Orlando Soriano, chief of the Southern Command---that Radulan Sahiron was killed by AFP forces during an assault on the group's hideout on Monday, June 6, 1994? 

Soriano even seems to know the relatives, or Sahiron "clan," so it isn't likely the Lt. General would mistake this identity with some other old, one-armed guy.

The detail about Janjalani himself being held in an internecine, or a tit-for-tat abduction scenario by Sahiron's relatives who were seeking a financial benefit in the altered landscape following Radulan's death, is so internally consistent, plausible and self-reinforcing a construction that it makes every narrative report of the Sipadan, Dos Palmas, and Basilan-school hostage-takings seem as artificial and silly as would The Three Stooges look acting in Kabuki drama. And this alibi also absolves Janjalani from participation in such a horrific, senseless crime.

While the "Global Jihad" web page is not necessarily trustworthy in its information, the current afp.mil.ph page is a pretty solid citation.



1Nov. 30, 2005, AP, U.S. Treasury Department moves to freeze assets of 3 Filipino members of Abu Sayyaf group, by Foster Klug,


June 8, 1994, AP / The Buffalo News, Rebels Take Hostages, Kill 15 in Philippines,
Wednesday

Followers of a renegade Muslim extremist waylaid a civilian convoy today, seized about 50 hostages and killed at least 15, officials said.

A wounded survivor said in a radio interview that the four gunmen killed male hostages because they were a burden as the rebels fled pursuing troops. He said he did not know what had happened to five women and a Catholic priest who were separated from the other hostages.

The attack occurred on the island of Basilan, which has no telephones.

Details were confused because different government agencies were reporting by voice radio to the Southern Command headquarters in nearby Zamboanga.

Jundam Abdula, Basilan's police chief, said armed followers of Abubakar Janjalani, leader of the Abu Sayyaf group, had stopped a convoy of a bus and two other vehicles seven miles from the town of Isabela.

Police said the gunmen seized about 50 of the 90 people in the convoy, then released all but 22.

In a radio dispatch from Basilan, Christopher Puno, spokesman for the 2nd Marine Brigade, reported that 16 hostages had been killed.

The survivor, Demetrio Abellana, conductor of one of the vehicles, did not say how many hostages were slain.

"They separated us from the women. Then we were hogtied, and then they sprayed us with automatic gunfire," said Abellana, who was hit in the leg. "I pretended to be dead."

First reports had identified the 22 hostages as Christian women teachers and a priest.

The kidnapped priest was identified as the Rev. Cirilo Nacorda. He had been assigned to a parish on Basilan as the successor to a Spanish priest, the Rev. Bernardo Blanco, who was kidnapped by the Abu Sayyaf group in March 1993 but escaped two months later.

Abdula said the gunmen also were responsible for the August 1992 kidnapping of Gerald Fraszczack, a Franciscan missionary from Chicago. Fraszczack was released several months later.

Kidnappings are common in Muslim areas of the southern Philippines, since those responsible generally escape prosecution because of links to influential clans.

Troops launched a major operation last week to destroy the fundamentalist Abu Sayyaf group, responsible for many bombings and kidnappings in the south.

Fighting has centered on the island of Jolo, about 100 miles southwest of Zamboanga. Basilan is between Zamboanga and Jolo.

The kidnapping followed reports that Janjalani has been taken captive by relatives of a slain deputy seeking to collect a reward.

Lt. Gen. Orlando Soriano, chief of the Southern Command, said Janjalani was being held hostage in a village on Jolo by relatives of Radulan Sahiron, who was killed Monday during an assault on the group's hideout.




Here's a more complete, time-stamped version of the article from the official AP archives, in which Lt. Gen. Soriano says he's already in negotiations with Radulan Sahiron's family for the arrest of Janjalani---adding, he would give Sahiron's survivors the sizable reward. The fact that Janjalani wasn't arrested, and that he and the Abu Sayyaf group continued to operate in such a reprehensible, illogical and ideologically counter-productive fashion (the storming of Ipil was less than a year in the future) means they were government sanctioned and approved. A vast body of additional evidence supports this conclusion.

Jun. 8, 1994, AP News Archive, Followers of Besieged Muslim Extremist Kill 16 Hostages, 6:56 AM ET

ZAMBOANGA, PHILIPPINES ZAMBOANGA, Philippines (AP) _ Followers of a renegade Muslim extremist waylaid a civilian convoy today, seized about 50 hostages and killed at least 16, officials said.

A wounded survivor said in a radio interview that the four gunmen killed male hostages because they were a burden as the rebels fled pursuing troops. He said he did not know what had happened to five women and a Roman Catholic priest who were separated from the other hostages.

The attack occurred on the island of Basilan, which has no telephones. Details were confused because different government agencies were reporting by voice radio to the Southern Command headquarters in nearby Zamboanga.

Basilan police chief Jundam Abdula said armed followers of Abubakar Janjalani, leader of the Abu Sayyaf group, stopped a convoy of one bus and two jeeps 7 miles from the town of Isabela on Basilan.

About 90 people were believed in the convoy. Police said the gunmen seized about 50 passengers and drivers, but released all but 22.

In a radio dispatch from Basilan, Christopher Puno, spokesman for the 2nd Marine Brigade, reported that 16 hostages had been killed.

The survivor, passenger jeep conductor Demetrio Abellana, did not say how many hostages were slain.

''They separated us from the women. Then we were hogtied and then they sprayed us with automatic gun fire,'' said Abellana, who was hit in the leg. ''I pretended to be dead.''

First reports had identified the 22 hostages as Christian women schoolteachers and a priest.

The kidnapped priest was identified as the Rev. Cirilo Nacorda. He had been assigned to a parish on Basilan as the successor to a Spanish priest, the Rev. Bernardo Blanco, who was kidnapped by the Abu Sayyaf group in March 1993 but escaped two months later.

Abdula said the gunmen were also responsible for the August 1992 kidnapping of Franciscan missionary Gerald Fraszczack of Chicago.

Fraszczack was released several months later. Kidnappings are common in Muslim areas of the southern Philippines, in part because those responsible are rarely prosecuted due to their links to influential clans.

Troops launched a major operation last week to destroy the fundamentalist Abu Sayyaf group, responsible for many bombings and kidnappings in the south.

Fighting has centered on the island of Jolo, about 100 miles southwest of Zamboanga. Basilan is between Zamboanga and Jolo.

The kidnapping followed reports that Janjalani has been taken captive by relatives of a slain deputy seeking to collect a reward.

Lt. Gen. Orlando Soriano, chief of the Southern Command, said Janjalani was being held hostage in a village on Jolo by relatives of Radulan Sahiron, who was killed Monday during an assault on the group's hideout.

Soriano said Sahiron's relatives wanted the $56,000 reward offered for Janjalani. On Tuesday, Gov. Tupay Loong of Sulu province, which includes Jolo, said he would add another $7,400.

The military commander said he has started negotiations with relatives of Sahiron for Janjalani's arrest. He added that the government would give them the reward.

The shadowy Abu Sayyaf group surfaced in 1993. Janjalani, a former student in Libya, espouses a social ideology more religiously oriented than the larger and more secular Moro National Liberation Front.

The front, which operates on Jolo, has been waging its insurgency for 20 years but entered into new peace talks with the government last year.

It appeared the offensive against Abu Sayyaf was launched to remove the group as a potential rival to the front within the 6 million-strong Muslim community.













http://www.globaljihad.net/view_page.asp?id=1409

Radulan  Sahiron

Radulan  Sahiron was born in the mid 30s’. He was a veteran of the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) from the early 70s’. then moved to the more militant Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) in 1981. In 1991 Radulan Sahiron was among the founders of Abu Sayyaf alongside Abdubakar Janjalani.  In some stage Radulan  Sahiron lost his arm in the ongoing fighting with the Philippines Army. Radulan Sahiron amazed friends and fellow mujahedeens alike with his expert horsemanship.

Radulan Sahiron became the chief of staff of Abu Sayyaf. On 11/30/2005, Radulan Sahiron’s assets, along with the assets of Abu-Sulaiman and Isnilon Hapilon were frozen by the USA Department of the Treasury and he was designated a terrorist. A reward up to $200,000 was offered for information leading to the capture of each person. Radulan  Sahiron is suspected by USA intelligence of masterminding the Sipadan Hijacking in 04/2000 and the Palawan Hijacking in May 2001. Radulan  Sahiron asked for the release of Ramzi Yousef in return for the capture hostages and when the demand was denied he, probably, ordered the beheading of Guellermo Sobero, one of the Palawan hostages. Eventually the direct killer of Guellermo SoberoAlhamser Manatad Limbong, was captured with the Zamboanga Cell in 03/2004.   

  


Radulan  Sahiron was pronounced dead three times by the Pilipino authorities - once on 09/29/2000, and the second time on 05/11/2005. On 12/19/2008 the Pilipino military said, the third time, it was highly probable that Abu Sayyaf leader Radulan  Sahiron and an INDONESIAN JI militant were killed in recent encounters in Sulu. On 10/06/2008 there were rumors that Radulan  Sahiron surrendered to the Philippines police in Zamboanga province, Mindanao.

Radulan  Sahiron was mentioned as a potential replacement to Khadafy Janjalani as Abu sayyaf leader after Khadafy Janjalani was killed in an encounter with the Philippine Army near Patikul in Jolo Island, on 12/27/2006. 

Toy (03/2009) the deeds or whereabouts of Radulan  Sahiron are unknown and he continues to deride the Philippines authorities.
The United States, on Tuesday 05/27/2009, offered up to 1 million dollars in rewards for tips leading to the capture of Radulan  Sahiron (see - 2.5$ 05.26.09).







March 28, 2010, Mindanao Examiner, Sayyaf camp falls in Sulu, sub-leader killed in firefight with troops


Abu Sayyaf leader Radulan Sahiron in this undated photo from the US Rewards for Justice Program. (Mindanao Examiner)

ZAMBOANGA CITY, Philippines (Mindanao Examiner / Mar. 28, 2010) – Government troops captured an encampment of the Al-Qaeda-linked Abu Sayyaf group in the southern Filipino province of Sulu, the military said Sunday.

It said an undetermined number of militants were also killed and two soldiers wounded in the fighting Friday that led to the fall of the encampment in the hinterland village of Panglayahan in Patikul town.

“The camp, which was strategically located at the foot hill of the mountainous Sinumaan complex, was heavily defended by about fifty Abu Sayyaf fighters. They, however, retreated after a fierce firefight resulting to numerous casualties on the terrorist while two Marines were wounded,” said Brigadier General Rustico Guerrero, commander of military forces in Sulu province.

The fighting was part of the military operation to capture senior militant leader Radullan Sahiron, a former commander of the Moro National Liberation Front which signed a peace deal with Manila in 1996.

It was unclear whether Sahiron was in the camp during the fighting or if he had escaped the offensive. But one of Sahiron’s aide was killed in the fighting and that his body was recovered at the weekend.

Troops also recovered 57 rockets and assorted weapons from the camp, Guerrero said.

Sahiron is one of top Abu Sayyaf leaders wanted by the United States for terrorism.

Washington also offered as much as $1 million reward for the capture of Sahiron, who was one of those behind the kidnappings of 21 mostly Western holidaymakers in Malaysia’s resort island of Sipadan in 2001 and three US citizens, including 17 Filipinos kidnapped from the Dos Palmas resort in Palawan province in the Philippines. (Mindanao Examiner)

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