Thursday, June 28, 2012

1905 Insurance Controversy



January 22, 1905, New York Times, John Carraway Arrested, Ex-Official of Equitable National Bank Held in New Orleans.
NEW ORLEANS, La., Jan. 21 -- John Carraway, formerly Second Vice President of the Equitable National Bank of New York, has been placed under arrest by United States officers on an indictment charging him with violation of the Federal statutes relative to National banks, and is now under bond of $4,000 to appear before the authorities in New York on March 8.




February 14, 1905, New York Times, Voting Power Sought For Policy Holders, Plan of the Alexander Interests in the Equitable Life.
JAMES H. HYDE'S CONTROL. At Present It Rests with Him, Representing the Majority Stock Interest -- Petition from Office Holders.
A petition signed by fifty of the office holders of the Equitable Life Assurance Society will be placed before the Directors at a meeting to-morrow asking for the policy holders of the society the perpetual and unrestricted right to elect its Directorate.


Feb. 15, 1905, New York Times, Arranging Question of Policy Holders’ Votes, Amicable Adjustment Expected in Equitable Life Society.
SEVERAL CONFERENCES HELD. Directors To-morrow Will Take Up the Question -- No Immediate Effect If Decision Is Reached.
A lawyer who has been in close touch with the negotiations between the Hyde and Alexander interests in the Equitable Life Assurance Society over the question of obtaining for the policy holders the right to vote for Directors, said last night that their present status justified the expectation of an amicable settlement at a date not far distant.


Feb. 16, 1905, New York Times, Equitable’s Board to Decide To-Day, Reported that Amicable Agreement Will Be Reached.
STATEMENTS FROM BOTH SIDES. Hyde's Friends Call Opposition a Conspiracy -- Too Much Power In One Man's Hands, Says Alexander.
When the Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society meet this afternoon the issues will be thrashed out that will determine whether the organization shall be changed from a stock to a mutual basis, and also whether James H. Hyde shall retain the Vice Presidency, which he has held for several years as the representative of the Hyde estate, holding a majority of the stock.


Feb. 17, 1905, New York Times, Editorial,
The differences of opinion which have arisen in the management of the Equitable Life Assurance Society were adjusted and reconciled yesterday through the unanimous vote of the Board of Trustees in a manner to protect the interests and win the approval and confidence of the policy holders and the public.


February 17, 1905, New York Times, The Equitable Society.
The differences of opinion which have arisen in the management of the Equitable Life Assurance Society were adjusted and reconciled yesterday through the unanimous vote of the Board of Trustees in a manner to protect the interests and win the approval and confidence of the policy holders and the public.


Feb. 17, 1905, New York Times, Mutualize Equitable By Hyde’s Consent, Old Officers, Including Hyde and Alexander, Re-elected. DEPEW SAVES THE SITUATION. In an Eloquent Speech He Tells the Directors That They Must Agree -- And They Do -- Harmony Restored.


Feb. 18, 1905, New York Times, Hyde Meets Alexander; Harmony Talk Follows, Equitable's Head Said to Have Explained Mutualization.
SOCIETY MAY GET STOCK. Jacob Schiff Says That the Hyde Holdings Will Be Sold Into the Equitable Treasury.
James W. Alexander and James H. Hyde, President and Vice President of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, respectively, and the heads of the two parties who up to the meeting of the Directors Thursday were in controversy over the control of the organization, had a long talk yesterday


Feb. 22, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Life Wins Wisconsin Test Case, Commissioner Host Enjoined from Revoking Licenses.
LOWER COURT IS REVERSED. State Official Sought to Compel Insurance Companies to Distribute Surplus Yearly Among Policy Holders.
MADISON, Wis., Feb. 21. -- The Supreme Court of Wisconsin to-day handed down a decision in the case of the Equitable Life Assurance Society against Zeno M. Host as Commissioner of Insurance, reversing the judgment of the court below in favor of the Insurance Commissioner and ruling favorably to the Equitable on all its contentions.


Feb. 25, 1905, New York Times, Sidney Dillon Ripley Dead,Victim of Appendicitis Treasurer of the Equitable.


Feb. 28, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Stock Suit, Court Asked to Appraise It Before Mutualization Proceeds.
Papers were serve yesterday at the offices of the Equitable Life Assurance Society in an action begun by Herbert G. Tull of Philadelphia and others to secure through the Supreme Court an appraisal of the stock of the society before any disposition is made of it in the mutualization now pending.



March 1, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Mutualization,
Progress of the Discussion by the Committee.


March 2, 1905, New York Times, Ask Policy Holders’ Aid in Mutualizatioo Plan, John D. Crimmins Heads Committee of the Equitable.
TO SEEK LEGISLATIVE HELP. Says Bill Has Been Prepared to Compel Companies to Mutualize -- Not Fighting Any Faction.
The following circular addressed to holders of policies in the Equitable Life Assurance Society was made public yesterday:


March 2, 1905, New York Times, Letter, Jacob H. Schiff, As a Trustee of the Equitable Life Assurance Society.


March 3, 1905, New York Times, Ask Equitable to Give Names Of the Insured, Letter Sent to Society by the Crimmins Committee.
HINT OF POSSIBLE CONFLICT. Crimmins Says Another Committee Has List of Policy Holders -- Not Taking Sides, He Adds.
The committee which yesterday morning issued a call to policy holders of the Equitable Life Assurance Society to join in an effort to secure to all policy holders the right to vote for Directors held a meeting yesterday afternoon at 15 Broad Street and organized. There were present of the eight signers of the call Mr. Crimmins, Henry Morgenthau, Charles Bulkeley Hubbell, and E.H. Outerbridge.


March 4, 1905, New York Times, New Party Takes Up Equitable Discussion, Bacon Speaks for Policy Holders Opposed to Crimmins.
PROPOSED BILL CONSIDERED. Vote for Every Share and Every Policy Holder -- John E. Parsons Joins List of Counsel Retained.
The committee of Equitable Life Assurance Society policy holders, of which John D. Crimmins is Chairman, held another meeting yesterday afternoon and selected John E. Parsons as counsel, in addition to the firm of Boardman, Platt Soley, who had been already retained. The committee discussed different phases of the proposed mutualization bill to be introduced at Albany, a rough draft of which has already been prepared.


March 7, 1905, New York Times, Hendricks Indorses Equitable’s New Home, Should Mutualize at Once, State Insurance Head Says.
NO LEGAL SNAG IN THE WAY. Feasibility of Step, He Declares, Was Demonstrated by the Germania Company.
ALBANY, March 6. -- Superintendent Francis Hendricks of the State Department of Insurance commends the movement to mutualize the Equitable Life Assurance Society in his annual report on life insurance, submitted to-night to the Legislature. He says.


March 8, 1905, New York Times, The Equitable's Prpblem, Mutualization Committee Meets -- No Change Yet in Situation.


March 12, 1905, New York Times, Letter, Equitable Life Assurance Society, Some Observations of an Informed and Interested Policy Holder.


March 13, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Committee Appeal, Asks Policy Holders to Sign Petition to the Legislature


March 14, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Committee, Not Yet Agreed on Method of Mutualization -- Stands Four to Three.
It is reported that the Mutualization Committee of the Equitable Life Assurance Society is divided, four to three, on the method by which the mutualization shall be accomplished, and although another meeting will be held to-day, there is no immediate prospect of an agreement.


March 14, 1905, New York Times, Sues Equitable Life, Woman Says J.H. Hyde Got $100,000 Yearly Salary -- Wants It Put Back.
ALBANY, March 13. -- An action was begun to-day in the Supreme Court, Saratoga County, by Mary S. Young, suing as a creditor and policy holder of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, against that corporation and James H. Hyde, to compel tile restoration by Mr. Hyde to the Equitable's treasury of the sum of $200,000, alleged to have been received by him in the last two years for salary as the Society's Vice President.


March 15, 1905, New York Times, Agree to Divide Equitable Board, Policy Holders to Elect 28, the Stockholders 24.
HYDE CONSENTS TO THE PLAN. Committee's Unanimous Recommendation Will Probably Be Acted Upon Immediately.
The committee of Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society appointed at the February meeting of the board to report a plan of mutualization, came to an agreement yesterday afternoon. The result is a plan to amend the charter so that the policy holders shall hereafter have the choice of twenty-eight out of the fifty-two Directors, leaving the other twenty-four Directors to the stockholding interests.


March 16, 1905, New York Times, Ripley Left $5,000,000, Equitable Treasurer Provided for Family Prior to Making Will.


March 16, 1905, New York Times, Aaks Speedy Action On Equitable Plan, Crimmins Committee Wants Directorate Changed at Once.
PRESIDENT RECEIVES NOTICE. Opposition to Delay Until Terms of Present Directors Expire, as Contemplated by Agreement.


March 16, 1905, New York Times, The Equitable Settlement,
The concessions which made possible the agreement to adopt the mutual plan in the government of the Equitable Life Assurance Society were in an eminent degree wise and generous. The Directors of the Society by their unanimous vote sanctioned the policy of mutualization.


March 20, 1905, New York Times, Opposes Equitable Delay, Frank H. Platt Thinks Mutualization Needed at Once.
Frank H. Platt, counsel for the Crimmins policy holders' committee, which has been urging the mutualization of the Equitable Life Assurance Society,
issued a statement yesterday as follows:


March 22, 1905, New York Times, Gradual Mutualization For the Equitable, Directors Unanimously Adopt Special Committee's Report.
YEAR-OLD POLICIES QUALIFY. Voting May Be by Proxy -- Counsel for Crimmins Committee Expresses Dissatisfaction.
The Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society by a unanimous vote yesterday adopted the plan of mutualization proposed by the Mutualization Committee appointed to consider the subject at the special meeting of the board on Feb. 13. The plan provides for the division of the Board of Directors between the stockholders of the society and the policy holders, so that the policy holders shall elect twenty-eight members of the board and the stockholders twentyfour.


March 24, 1905, New York Times, Hendricks Grants Hearing, To Listen to Crimmins Equitable Committee on Tuesday.
The Crimmins committee of Equitable Life policy holders yesterday declared officially that it was opposed to the mutualization plan adopted by the Equitable Directors and that it had asked Francis Hendricks, the State Superintendent of Insurance, for a hearing. This announcement was issued:


March 29, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Hearing Waits On Mediation, Supt. Hendricks Has Plan for Mutualization to Satisfy All. EXPECT RESULTS IN A WEEK Senator Brackett Applies for Permission to Bring Suit to Oust Messrs. Hyde and Schiff.


March 30, 1905, New York Times, The Equitable Situation, And the Effect of the Propinquity of Pelf Upon Mr. Brackett's Curiosity. Senator Brackett, in his petition asking Attorney General Mayer to put Mr. Hyde and Mr. Schiff out of the Equitable management, charges Mr. Hyde with selling to the Equitable at $5.00 each shares of the Equitable Trust Company that are now quoted in the market at $650.


April 1, 1905, New York Times, EQUITABLE HARMONY; NEW PLAN ARRANGED;
Policy Holders Soon to Have Their Twenty-eight Directors. 14 THIS YEAR; 14 NEXT. Two Present Vacancies to be Filled by Men Approved by Crimmins Committee -- Hendricks at Harmony Meeting.
Superintendent Hendricks of the State Insurance Department apparently succeeded yesterday in bringing about the prospect of a harmonious adjustment of the differences that have arisen in the Equitable Life Assurance Society. Mr. Hendricks called a meeting at his office of the persons interested, and after a two hours' discussion of the disputed points of the mutualization project it was said that a plan had been submitted and generally approved.


April 2, 1905, New York Times, QUICK MUTUALIZATION OF EQUITABLE LIFE; Final Agreement After Conference With Hendricks. HYDE DEMANDS AN INQUIRY Wants It Immediate, Thorough and Drastic -- Four New Members of Executive Committee at Once
Following an agreement between Elihu Root, of counsel for the Equitable Life Assurance Society, and the Crimmins Policy Holders' Committee upon a modified plan of mutualization, James Hazen Hyde, First Vice President of the society and owner of the controlling stock interest through the estate of his father, Henry B. Hyde, last night announced that he had requested the State Superintendent of Insurance to make an "immediate, thorough, and drastic" investigation of the organization.


April 2, 1905, New York Times MAYER WILL WAIT.;
Doesn't Want to Affect Equitable Matter by Premature Discussion.


April 3, 1905, New York Times, CRIMMINS SAYS HYDE SHOULD STAY IN OFFICE; Policy Holders' Leader Gives Views on Equitable Situation. FAULT NOT ON ONE SIDE Belief That the Trouble Will Be Adjusted as Agreed at the Meeting with Hendricks.
John D. Crimmins, Chairman of the policy holders' committee which has been working for the mutualization of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, gave an interview last night after having read the statement made public by James H. Hyde on Saturday night, in which he demanded an "immediate, thorough, and drastic" investigation of the management of the organization founded by his father.


April 4, 1905, New York Times, AGGRESSIVE ACTION ORDERED BY HYDE; Untermyer to Direct His Forces in the Equitable. HENDRICKS INQUIRY STARTS. At Request of Alexander of Feb. 21 -- President Accuses Hyde of Usurpation -- $135,000 Payment to Tarbell.


April 4, 1905, New York Times, TO PUBLISH THE RESULT. No Public Hearings, It Is Understood, in Equitable Matter,
ALBANY, April 3. -- State Superintendent Hendricks of the Insurance Department to-day designated Chief Examiner Isaac Vanderpoel to conduct the investigation into the Equitable Life Assurance Society. Superintendent Hendricks's determination to undertake the investigation was reached after a conference between him and Gov. Higgins.


April 5, 1905, New York Times,
MAY TRY TO-MORROW TO OUST ALEXANDER; He Is Charged with Injuring the Equitable Society. HYDE ISSUES LONG STATEMENT. Which He Presented to Directors on Feb. 15 -- Compares His Actions with Those of the President,


April 5, 1905, New York Times Letter, MR. TARBELL'S RENEWALS.;
Their Sale Defended by a Former Agent of the Equitable. by Edgar A. Walz,
I believe a great deal of harm would be the result of the many misleading statements regarding the sale of Mr. Gage E. Tarbell's renewals to the Equitable Society, if it is not made clear to the many policy holders and the public how he retained an interest in that agency business.


April 6, 1905, New York Times, EQUITABLE RESOLUTION UP.; Brackett's Plan for Inquiry Goes to Finance Committee After Wrangle.
ALBANY, April 5. -- Senator Brackett to-day succeeded in getting before the Senate his resolution providing for a legislative investigation of the affairs of the Equitable Life Assurance Society. The resolution provides that the investigation shall be made by a joint legislative committee, consisting of three members of the Senate and five members of the Assembly.


April 6, 1905, New York Times, ALEXANDER AGREES TO CRIMMINS PLAN; Equitable Likely to Adopt Two-Year Mutualization To-day.
INSURES PEACE, IT IS BELIEVED. Demand from Policy Holders and Those Outside Warring Factions That Contest Cease.
When the Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society meet this afternoon, President James W. Alexander will accept the two-year plan of mutualization proposed by the Crimmins Policyholders' Committee to the Superintendent of Insurance last Saturday, as outlined in THE TIMES of that day and agreed to for recommendation to the Board of the Equitable by Elihu Root of counsel for James H. Hyde.


April 7, 1905, New York Times, EQUITABLE ADOPTS THE CRIMINALS PLAN; For Two-Year Mutualization---Controversy Condemned. NON-FACTIONISTS IN CONTROL Demand Truce -- Meeting To-morrow to Determine Transfer of Power in Executive Committee


April 7, 1905, New York Times, LOTS OF INSURANCE TALK.; Brackett and Moses Attack the Equitable Society's Methods.


April 8, 1905, New York Times, EQUITABLE MEETING PUT OFF A FEW DAYS; Task of Naming New Directors Is Considered Important.
PEACE MOVE STILL STRONGER. Sparring by Factions Not Viewed with Complacency -- Col. Bacon Looks to Courts for Remedy.
There will be no meeting of the Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society to-day as had been planned, but the Directors will probably meet on Tuesday or Wednesday of next week to hear from the conference between the special committee of the hoard and the Policy Holders' Committee in regard to the change of control of the Executive Committee.


April 8, 1905, New York Times, EQUITABLE MEETING PUT OFF A FEW DAYS; Task of Naming New Directors Is Considered Important.
PEACE MOVE STILL STRONGER. Sparring by Factions Not Viewed with Complacency -- Col. Bacon Looks to Courts for Remedy.
There will be no meeting of the Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society to-day as had been planned, but the Directors will probably meet on Tuesday or Wednesday of next week to hear from the conference between the special committee of the hoard and the Policy Holders' Committee in regard to the change of control of the Executive Committee.


April 9, 1905, New York Times, NEW CHARTER SENT OFF WHEN SUIT WAS BEGUN; Which Happened First Interests Lawyers in Equitable Matter. DOES IT MEAN NEW DELAY? Lord Says It Is His Suit Alone -- Adjournment While Charter Is on Way to Albany.
Justice Maddox, in the Supreme Court, Brooklyn, yesterday heard argument on an order to show cause why an injunction sought by Franklin B. Lord of the law firm of Lord, Day Lord to restrain the officers and Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society from putting into effect the mutualization plan should not be issued.


April 10, 1905, New York Times, ALEXANDER AND HYDE TO FIGHT LORD SUIT; Counsel for Equitable Factions Unite Against Injunction. NO GAIN BY IT, SAYS CRIMMINS. Mutualization May Be Delayed, but Cannot Be Stopped, Policy Holders' Representative Declares.
For the first time since the recent trouble started within the Equitable Life Assurance Society the Hyde and Alexander forces will line up on the same side to-day in a common effort to frustrate the plan of Franklin B. Lord, a minority stockholder, who is seeking to restrain the Directors of the Equitable from putting through the mutualization plan to which both sides have agreed.


April 11, 1905, New York Times, LORD SUIT ADJOURNED FOR HYDE'S COUNSEL; Denial That Alexander's Lawyers Represent Equitable.
COURT HEARS THE ARGUMENT. Hornblower Opposes Shepard's Contention That Stockholders Would Lose Rights by Proposed Mutualization.
Counsel representing the Equitable Life Assurance Society, who in this instance happen to be without exception among the legal advisers of President James W. Alexander, spent the whole day yesterday before Justice Maddox, in Special Term of the Supreme Court in Brooklyn, in argument on the suit of Franklin B. Lord for an injunction to restrain the Equitable Directors from taking further steps in putting the mutualization plan into effect.


April 12, 1905, New York Times, ACCUSES ALEXANDER OF VIOLATING TRUST; Agreed to Protect Equitable Stock, Untermyer Says. SHEPARD ATTACKS HENDRICKS. Refused Hearing, He Declares -- Morse Joins Lord Suit -- Untermyer Talks of Agreeing Away Rights. ACCUSES ALEXANDER OF VIOLATING TRUST.
The hearing yesterday before Justice Maddox in the Supreme Court in Brooklyn on the application of Franklin B. Lord for an injunction restraining the Equitable Life Assurance Society's officers and Directors from carrying out the mutualization plan contained in the amended charter, served to do two things.


April 13, 1905, New York Times, RIGID INVESTIGATION FOR EQUITABLE---FRICK; Calls for Details of Every Phase of Society's Business. EXPENDITURES, SALARIES, ETC. In Addition to Figures Furnished Committee Will Have Its Own Experts -- Wove to Oust Alexander. RIGID INVESTIGATION FOR EQUITABLE---FRICK.
Henry C. Frick, Chairman of the committee of Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society appointed to investigate, fully its management and condition, sent yesterday to President James W. Alexander a letter requesting information of the most detailed and comprehensive character covering every phase of the charges and counter charges made against officers and Directors of the society during the factional differences that have been aired in the last two months.


April 13, 1905, New York Times, POSE ODELL AS A MARTYR.; Consolidated Gas and Equitable Seek Revenge, Friends Say.


April 15, 1905, New York Times, VOTED WITHOUT SHARES, TULL'S LAWYER CHARGES; Brings New Suit to Restrain the Equitable Directors.
HE ALSO CITES HENDRICKS. Agency Directors, It Is Predicted, Will Ask Some Questions at Meeting Next Week.
A. Edward Woodruff, attorney for Herbert G. Tull and other policy holders of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, went before Justice Blanchard in the Supreme Court yesterday, and asked for an order to show cause why Superintendent of Insurance Hendricks should not be restrained from approving the mutualization plan adopted by the Directors and the Directors and officers of the society be restrained from putting it into effect.


April 16, 1905, New York Times, Letter, by James H. Hyde, THE EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY.


April 18, 1905, New York Times, HYDE TO PRESENT CASE TO EQUITABLE AGENTS; Will Lay Statement Before Their Meeting To-day. ALEXANDER IS INDORSED. This at a Caucus Held by 180 of the 220 Agents Assembled for Today's Meeting.
General agents of the Equitable Life Assurance Society to the number of 220 arrived at the Hotel Savoy yesterday to attend a meeting called for to-day, They were kept busy from the start. There were several caucuses, much canvassing -- this time among themselves -- and a lot of discussion.


April 18, 1905, New York Times, HYDE TO PRESENT CASE TO EQUITABLE AGENTS; Will Lay Statement Before Their Meeting To-day. ALEXANDER IS INDORSED. This at a Caucus Held by 180 of the 220 Agents Assembled for Today's Meeting.
General agents of the Equitable Life Assurance Society to the number of 220 arrived at the Hotel Savoy yesterday to attend a meeting called for to-day, They were kept busy from the start. There were several caucuses, much canvassing -- this time among themselves -- and a lot of discussion.


April 19, 1905, New York Times, EQUITABLE AGENTS ASK STATE TO ACT; Hear Hyde -- Indorse Alexander, Tarbell and Frick. WANT FULL MUTUALIZATION. Hyde and Alexander Letters Given Out -- Alexander Absolutely Denies Participation in Syndicate Dealings.


April 19, 1905, New York Times, NEW COMMITTEE STARTED, Equitable Policy Holders of New England Form Protective Body.


April 20, 1905, New York Times, Ohio Won't Oust Equitable.


April 21, 1905, New York Times, GOVERNOR TO HEAR AGENTS.;Equitable Men Will See Hendricks at Syracuse To-day.
ALBANY, April 20. -- Gov. Higgins announced to-night that on Saturday he will give a hearing to the agents of the Equitable in the Executive Chamber, and that to-morrow, in Syracuse. Superintendent Hendricks will give them a hearing.


April 22, 1905, New York Times, FOR MUTUALIZATION, THE GOVERNOR SAYS; But Tells Equitable Agents Courts Must Decide. HAS POLICY HOLDERS AT HEART Hears Long Appeal for Legislation -- Might Send Message on Subject -- Attack Made on Hyde.
ALBANY, April 21. -- The Equitable Life Assurance Society matter reached Gov. Higgins directly to-day. A committee of some thirty general agents appealed to him to interfere in some manner whereby immediate mutualization could be realized or cause the Legislature to enact legislation at once to bring about that result.


April 22, 1905, New York Times, THOROUGH INQUIRY -- HENDRICKS; Tells Agents He Will Find Equitable Dummies If They Exist.
SYRACUSE, April 21. -- Preferably mutualization, the turning over of substantial control to the policy holders, or some other remedy to relieve the embarrassing situation in the affairs of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, was the burden of the request made of Superintendent of Insurance Hendricks by the Committee of General Agents who laid their wishes before him here to-day.


April 22, 1905, New York Times, ASK FOR A RECEIVER.; Equitable Policy Holders at Chicago Apply to Federal Court.


April 22, 1905, New York Times, EQUITABLE BILL AT ALBANY.; Embodies Views of Agents -- Gives All Directors to Policy Holders.


April 23, 1905, New York Times, NO ACTION ON HYDE LETTER.; Equitable Agents Decide That Committee Cannot Reply to it.


April 24, 1905, New York Times, AGENTS OF EQUITABLE SEND BRIEF TO ALBANY; Hope to Convince Governor of Necessity of Legislation. POINT OUT FAULTS IN LAW. Want Difference Between Life Insurance and Other Corporations Recognized in Statute.
When the committee or Equitable agents went up to Albany last week to ask Gov. Higgins to help legislate the Equitable Life Assurance Society into a mutual concern one of the agents who was supposed to be particularly well informed on the legal status of the matter missed the train. The arguments that he had prepared did not reach the Governor, but they are on the way to him now.


April 25, 1905, New York Times, ASKS FOR A RECEIVER FOR EQUITABLE SURPLUS; Suit Started for Maryland Policy Holder in Court Here. ILLEGAL RETENTION ALLEGED. Also Illegal Use of $80,000,000 "for an Ulterior Purpose" -- Growth of Surplus Shown.


April 25, 1905, New York Times, AGENTS FOR ALEXANDER.; Pittsburg Men Pledge Support to Equitable's President.


April 26, 1905, The San Fransico Call, Page 2, Column 4, To Turn Light On Equitable.


April 26, 1905, New York Times, Page 1, Column 3, Hendricks and Feick Agree As To Inquiry; Equitable Committee to Help in Rigid Investigation. KNOX JOINS CONFERENCES. Hill Says His Withdrawal from Committee Is Solely Because of Lack of Time. Philander C. Knox, ex-Attorney General of the United States and now counsel for the Equitable Life investigating committee, met with State Superintendent of Insurance Hendricks and Henry C. Frick yesterday for the first of what will probably be a series of conferences over their respective undertakings.


April 26, 1905, New York Times, MAYER WILL AWAIT FACTS.; No Action by Attorney General Upon Brackett's Equitable Petition.


April 26, 1905, New York Times Letter, WHAT IS MUTUALIZATION?, The Lesson to be Drawn from the Meeting of the Equitable Agents.


April 27, 1905, New York Times, ASKS LEGISLATURE TO ACT.; Palmer Withdraws Equitable Resolution, but Will Present It Later.
ALBANY, April 26. -- A concurrent resolution for the investigation of the Equitable Life Assurance Society was offered in the Assembly this morning by Mr. Palmer of Schoharie. Mr. Rogers, the majority leader, objected to its consideration, saying he desired to be acquainted first with its contents. Mr. Palmer promised that he should have the opportunity and withdrew the resolution.


April 27, 1905, New York Times, SANCTIONS BRACKETT SUIT.; Attorney General Gives His Consent to Action Against Equitable.
ALBANY, April 26. -- Attorney General Mayer to-night gave to Senator Edgar T. Brackett his consent to the bringing of an action by the latter against certain officers and Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, in the name of Mary S. Young of Saratoga, to recover from the society moneys alleged to have been wrongfully converted by them.


April 27, 1905, New York Times, STATE OFFICIALS CALLED.; Will Meet Here Next Week to Look Into Equitable Situation.


April 29, 1905, New York Times, POLICY INTERESTS SAFE, FRICK SAYS IN LETTER; Addresses Communication to Holders in the Equitable.
ASSETS ABSOLUTELY SOUND If Anything, Investments Have Been Too Conservative, He Says -- No Move for Retirements On.
Henry C. Frick, chairman of the investigating committee appoinetd by the Directors of the Equitable Life to investigate the affairs of the society, last night sent a letter to the policy holders assuring them that their interests were absolutely safe.



May 1, 190-5, New York Times, Attack By Knowles On Tarbell's Methods,Former Equitable Life Official Tells of Chicago Rebates. BUSINESS EXPIRED QUICKLY. Declares the Present Second Vice President Violated His Own Instructions

Henry H. Knowles, who until Thursday last was Supervisor of Agencies for the Equitable Life Assurance Society, and who was on that day discharged from the company's service, issued a statement last night, in which he sets forth at length some alleged transactions by Gage E. Tarbell, the Second Vice President of the Equitable.


May 3, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Controversy Calls State Officials, Insurance Commissioners Seek First-Hand Information. ALEXANDER REPLIES TO HYDE. Denies in Affidavit That He Has Betrayed Trust -- Attacks the Vice President's Motives

Superintendents of Insurance from five States, members of the Executive Committee of the National Convention of Insurance Commissioners, will be here by to-morrow to ascertain at first hand the details of the controversy in the Equitable Life Assurance Society. The Exective Committee of the convention will hold a formal meeting at the Hoffman House to-morrow morning and plan for such action as they consider the circumstances require.


May 3, 1905, New York Times, No Division of Surplus.; Wisconsin Court Against Equitable Suit of Insurance Commissioner.


May 4, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Suit In Hartford,Based on an Error Made by Society's Advertising Department.
HARTFORD, Conn., May 3. -- Actions have been brought by the State of Connecticut through Attorney General King against the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States and the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York, alleging that advertisements of the companies published early in the present year in a Hartford newspaper do not correspond with the last verified statement made by the companies to the Insurance Department of this State.


May 5, 1905, New York Times, To Proceed In Court Against Alexander, Hyde and McIntyre Write, Refusing to Accept His Resignation. EARLY HENDRICKS REPORT. He Tells Outside State Superintendents So When They Question Him About Equitable Matter.


May 6,1905, New York Times, Equitable Directors Called, Officiers Not,, Unsigned Summons Out for a Meeting on Monday. MORE TALK OF SYNDICATES. Story from the Alexander Side That Hyde Headed One That Got $800,000 in Profits
A new element of mystery was added to the Equitable Life controversy yesterday by the issuance of an unsigned call to the Directors of the society for an informal conference in the board room on Monday.


May 7, 1905, New York Times, May Stop Equitable Talk,; Directors to Act, It Is Believed -- Hyde Not to Resign, Untermyer Says.
The belief was general in circles connected with the Equitable Life Assurance controversy yesterday that strenuous efforts would be made by the Directors who might attend the conference on Monday to come to some conclusion that would stop the public airing of the Equitable controversy that was taken up afresh last week.


May 8, 1905, New York Times, Policy Holders Own Surplus---Alexander, Profits Theirs, Writes Equitable's President. SAYS HE WILL NOT RESIGN. Asserts That "Proprietary Regime" Must Succumb -- Thinks Policy Holders Should Elect All Directors.


May 9, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Directors Cited By Brackett,; To Answer for Mismanagement, If There Was Any. SUMMONSED AT CONFERENCE. Twenty-three Directors Had Some Talk as to a New President -- Formal Meeting Soon. EQUITABLE DIRECTORS CITED BY BRACKETT.
Gathered in the board room of the Equitable Life Assurance Society at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon, discussing the charges and counter-charges made by the Hyde and Alexander parties against each other, were the following-named members of the Equitable Directorate:


May 10, 1905, New York Times, Loan Swindle Cost the Equitable $27,000;Arrest of ex-Convict Follows Second Attempt of Same Sort. WATCH KEPT ON EMPLOYEE. Policy Stolen from Company's Vaults and Then Sent Back as Security for the Loan


May 11, 1905, The Evening World, Page 3, Alexander Will Have To Go, Says Crimmins. Equitable Policy Holders'Committee Has Reached That Conclusion. FINANCIEERS IN PANIC. Amazing Number of Salaries Drawn by Yound Hyde Makes Inquisitors Gasp.


May 11, 1905, New York Times, Strong Stock Market, Equitable Settlement Given as One Reason for the Bulge.


May 11, 1905, New York Times, Morton Right For the Place, A Good Man, Says M.E. Ingalls, Late of the Equitable Directorate.


May 12, 1905, New York Times, Questions To Winthrop, Equitable Financial Inquiry Continued -- Several Conferences Held.
Henry Rogers Winthrop, financial manager of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, was before Superintendent Hendricks of the State Insurance Department all day yesterday answering questions about the financial transactions that are included within the scope of the State Department's investigation. Mr. Winthrop and Mr. Hendricks began their session early in the morning and it required the services of four pages to carry to the board room the books upon which the questions were based.


May 14, 1905, New York Times, Hyde’s Complaint Against Alexander; Full Text of Petition in the Action Against Equitable's President. IS BEING SUED AS TRUSTEE Hyde Declares Alexander Acted with Crimmins Committee -- Tells of Syndicate Transactions.


May 17, 1905, New York Times, Talk of W. N. Cromwell As Equitable Mediator, He Refuses to Discuss Story -- No Confirmation Elsewhere. INQUIRIES SUIT CRIMMINS. Says His Committee Won't Disband -- Declines to Answer Platt -- Frick Committee Starts Investigation


*May 19, 1905, New York Times, Complains To Frick, Favoritism Alleged in Fire Insurance for Equitable Clients.
Moses Tanenbaum of the insurance firm of I. Tanenbaum & Co., with offices in the Whitehall Building, Battery Place, sent yesterday to Chairman Henry C. Frick, of the investigating committee of Equitable Firectors, a letter in which he called the committee's attention to an alleged practice in the society of insertinf in its bond and mortgage forms a provision compelling the holder of the mortgage to procure his fire insurance through a broker of the Equitable's selection. Coupled with this information was the statement that a near relative of an officer of the society is the broker through whom the fire insurance on property mortgaged to the Equitable is placed.

Deputy Superindendent of Insurance Robert Hunter, with Congressman Driscoll of Syracuse, Superintendent Hendricks's personal counsel yesterday took up the examination of William H. McIntyre, Fourth Vice President of the Equitable, who was once private secretary to the late Henry B. Hyde. Mr. McIntyre, was before the Deputy Superintendent all day. The Frick investigating committee also held a session yesterday in the Equitable Building.

In the Supreme Ciurt yesterday Justice Green baum reserved decision on the application of William McCulloh of Alexander & Green to vacate the order to show cause why James H. Hyde, James W. Alexander, and gage E. Tarbell should not be examined before trial in the suit of Herbert E. Tull of Phildelphia to enforce a distribution of the Equitable's surplus. Yesterday's daily peace report, had it that William Nelson Cromwell had become one of the counsel representing President Alexander.


May 20, 1905, New York Times, Says He Got $54,000 On Equitable Policy, Lobley Offers to Restore $30,000 for Clemency. PAPER STOLEN THREE TIMES. Prisoner Charged with $27,000 Theft Confesses -- Others Are Implicated, He Asserts.
Samuel Lobley, alias William Dailey, under indictment for grand larceny and receiving stolen property, the charge growing out of the theft and hypothecation of a fifty-thousand-dollar paid-up policy issued by the Equitable Life Assurance Society to R.H. Cotton of Brookline, Mass., has made a full confession, admitting that he obtained, not $27,000, as the officials of the society alleged, but $54,000.


May 20, 1905, New York Times, EQUITABLE DIRECTORS GET BRACKETT CHARGES; He Asks Hyde's Salary Back, Also Dinner and Ball Expenses. ATTACKS ALEXANDER, TOO. Directors Accused of Paying $2,000,000 More Than Stock Was Worth -- Cromwell New Mediator.
The complaint in the suit brought by Senator Brackett of Saratoga for Mary S. Young, a policy holder and the holder of one share of stock in the Equitable Life Assurance Society, to compel an accounting from all the Directors for their stewardship of the interests of the institution, was served upon the board here yesterday.


May 21, 1905, The Evening World, Page 3, Equitable's Dummy List Named In Suit. New Charges Made aginst Directors in Action for An Accounting. BROUGHT BY MRS. YOUNG. Alleges as Policy-Holder Assets Have Been Used to Settle Scandal Suits.


May 24, 1905, New York Times, PLAN FOR TRUSTEES TO RUN THE EQUITABLE; Said to be Peace Proposition Now Before Hyde. HENDRICKS QUIZZES TARBELL. Loud Talk at Examination -- Vice President Flushed When He Leaves, State Official Cool.
Second Vice President Gage E. Tarbell of the Equitable Life was on for examination before Superintendent Hendricks of the State Insurance Department yesterday in the board room. Voices were frequently raised high and spoke in no pleasant tones. When Mr. Tarbell came out he was considerably flushed.


May 25, 1905, New York Times, Roosevelt and Equitable, Refers Matter to Commerce Department -- Whitman Sees Him.
William F. King, former President of the Merchants' Association, received yesterday the reply of President Roosevelt to the letter which Mr. King wrote several days ago asking that the President put on foot an investigation of the Equitable Life Assurance Society and generally of the conditions of the insurance business throughout the United States.


May 26, 1905, New York Times, Control of Insurance Before Mr. Roosevelt, Cromwell and an Equitable Director Asked His Support. TRUSTEE PLAN ALSO URGED. Cromwell and Gulliver Confer with Untermyer About This -- Tarbell Denies Trouble with Hendricks.
William Nelson Cromwell, who recently came into the Equitable Life Assurance controversy, ostensibly as general mediator between the warring factions in the society, recently made a trip to Washington with a prominent Director of the Equitable for the purpose of enlisting President Roosevelt's support for the settlement plan that is being pushed just now by a strong peace element in the board.


May 27, 1905, New York Times, SQUABBLE AT HEARING BEFORE GOV. HIGGINS, Bill to Let Gotham Hotel Sell Liquor the Cause. EQUITABLE DINNER DINNER RECALLED. S.B. Brownell of Fifth Avenue Church in Wordy War with Rand -- Not Nan Patterson, He Says


May 27, 1905, New York Times, Enjoins Equitable From Mutualizing, Justice Maddox's Decision in Franklin B. Lord's Suit. CALLS STOCK VOTE PROPERTY. No Amendment to Charter Possible Without Unanimous Vote of Stock -- Hyde Trustee Offer Stands. ENJOINS EQUITABLE FROM MUTUALIZATION


May 28, 1905, New York Times, Attorney General to Wait, Will Not Act for Present on Equitable Charter Amendment.


May 29, 1905, New York Times, Letter, James W. Alexander et al, Predic a Reversal of Maddax Ruling,
Opinion of Alexander's Lawyer on Equitable Mutualization. CALL EFFECTS STARTLING
Say Holder of One Share May Now Defy All Others, Directors and Policy Holders.
A communication addressed by President James W. Alexander of the Equitable Life Assurance Society to the company's managers and agents was made public last night. It relates to the ruling made by Justice Maddox in the Lord suit on Friday, when he enjoined the carrying out of the proposed mutualization plan. [Justice Maddox rules for stockholders over policy-holders]


May 30, 1905, New York Times, Doubt of Tarbell’s Tenure, Hyde's Advisers Against Compromise in the Equitable Now.
With the meeting of the Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society scheduled for to-morrow, the interest in the controversy within the organization is centred in the report which the Frick committee will make at that time on the charges of mismanagement made by the Hyde and Alexander factions against each other.




June 1, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Plan To Distribute Equitable Surplus, Frick Committee Recommends that Deferred Dividend, Under Which Great Fund Has Grown, Be Abandoned -- Would Revolutionize Insurance Business.


June 1, 1905, New York Times, REPORT ON EQUITABLE WILL FORCE PEACE; Readjustment Likely Which Will End Scandals. CRITICISMS SPARE NOBODY, May Be Made Known To-Day After More Discussions---Ingalls Won't Be Chairman.


June 1, 1905, New York Times, LOBLEY OFFERS TO YIELD $30,000 TO EQUITABLE; Compromise Declined and His Trial for Fraud Begins. GOT CASH ON STOLEN POLICY, Got $55,000 in Three Loans and a Fourth Had Been Authorized -- Notary Censured.
The trial of Samuel Lobley, who is accused of defrauding the Equitable Life Assurance Society of more than $55,000, began yesterday before Judge Crane in Part I. of the Criminal Division of the Kings County Court.


June 2, 1905, New York Times, LAY FRICK REPORT TO STANDARD OIL; Conspiracy Charges Made in Equitable Fight. HARRIMAN REPUTED LEADER, Story of an Alleged Plot to Seize Society's Assets Put Out On Behalf of Accused Officials. LAY FRICK REPORT TO STANDARD OIL


June 2, 1905, New York Times, EQUITABLE SWINDLER ADMITS HIS CRIME; Pleads Guilty to Theft and Tells How It Was Done. SAYS A CLERK TEMPTED HIM, Promises Restitution and Begs the Court's Mercy -- Hint of Other Accomplices Unfounded.
Samuel Edwards Lobley, who with the aid of two accomplices, got $33,000 out of the coffers of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, pleaded guilty yesterday to grand larceny in the first degree and receiving stolen property, throwing himself on the mercy of the court. Judge Crane of Brooklyn, before whom the plea was entered, said he would pronounce sentence on Monday.


June 2, 1905, New York Times, Frick Report an Absorbing Subject, TOPICS IN WALL STREET.; Bond Market's Weakness.


June 3, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Young J. H. Hyde Makes a Bitter Reply To Enemies, Gives the Lie to President Alexander and Issues a Remarkable Statement in His Own Defense-- He Will Fight to the Last.


June 3, 1905, New York Times, KILL FRICK REPORT IN BITTER FIGHT; Harriman, Frick, and Bliss Resign from Equitable. LEFT MEETING IN ...


June 3, 1905, New York Times, STANDARD OIL'S DENIAL.; Not a Party to a Conspiracy to Obtain Control of the Equitable. Standard Oil Company.


June 4, 1905, New York Times, HYDE TO QUIT A PITTSBURG CO.; One of the Far-Reaching Results of the Equitable's Quarrels.


June 4, 1905, New York Times, MANAGER IN IOWA QUITS.; Carries Equitable's Agents and Office Force There to a New Company.


June 4, 1905, New York Times, HASTY AND UNFAIR, ALEXANDER SAYS,; Declares Frick Committee Convicted Him Without a Hearing. HE WAS HAMPERED BY CUSTOM Sought to Change Equitable Methods Gradually -- Denies Part in Improper Syndicates.The reply of President James W. Alexander of the Equitable to the report of the Frick committee, submitted to the meeting of the board on Thursday, is as follows:


June 4, 1905, New York Times, LINCOLN MAY HEAD EQUITABLE'S BOARD; Talk of Abraham Lincoln's Son for the New Office. HYDE'S CONTROL IS COMPLETE, Harriman-Frick Party Routed and the Alexanders Seek Peace as Reorganization Approaches.
Robert Todd Lincoln of Chicago, the son of Abraham Lincoln, Secretary of War in President Arthur's first Administration and Minister to the Court of St. James's from 1889 to 1893, was talked of yesterday as a probable choice for the office of Chairman of the board of the Equitable Life Assurance Society under the reorganization determined upon at Friday's stormy meeting of the Directors..


June 4, 1905, New York Times, Editorial, THE AFFAIRS OF THE EQUITABLE.


June 4, 1905, New York Times, FULL FRICK REPORT ON THE EQUITABLE;, It Finds the Officers Guilty of Breach of Trust. THEIR REMOVAL DEMANDED.


June 4, 1905, The Utica Journal, Affairs of the Equitable. Alexander and Hyde Form an Alliance, FORSWEAR WALL STREET. No More Entangling Alliances With Frenzied Financiers--Robert T. Lincoln May Be Chosen As Chairman of the Board of Directors. Counsel For Hyde Issues Statement.


June 5, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Mills May Quit the Equitable; Coolidge Is Out, Melville E. Ingalls Also Likely to Join Other Directors in Leaving the Service of the Great Insurance Corporation.


June 5, 1905, The Watertown [NY] Daily Times, Page 1, Column 4, THOROUGH PROBING, GOVERNOR S COMMENT RELATIVE TO THE EQUITABLE SCANDAL, TO D0 ALL IN HIS POWER, To Correct Any Evils that May Exist— His Views Bearding Legislative Action on Entire Insuraace Situation—Latest Developments la Equitable Affairs.


June 5, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Equitable Will Cut All Salaries, Full Board of Directors Will Hereafter Pass on the Investment of Funds of the Society -- More Reisnations handed In.


June 5, 1905, New York Times, EQUITABLE PEACE BROUGHT NEARER; A Confident Statement from Counsel for Hyde. HINT OF NEW DEVELOPMENTS, Possible Attack by harriman from Outside the Only Cloud---Lincoln Won't Be Chairman.Samuel Untermyer, counsel for Vice President James H. Hyde of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, declared positively in a statement issued yesterday afternoon that the outlook for a permanent and satisfactory settlement of the society's troubles had at no time been brighter than at present.


June 6, 1905, New York Times, FRICK IN CONFERENCE.; Talks with Presidents of Pittsburg Trust Companies -- Rumors Thereon.
PITTSBURG, June 5. -- H.C. McEldowney, President of the Union Trust Company, spent several hours to-day with H.C. Frick in Mr. Frick's office here. The Union Trust Company is the local liquidating agent for the Equitable Life Assurance Society, and James H. Hyde of the Equitable Company is a Director in the company.


June 6, 1905, New York Times, INGALLS'S RESIGNATION COMING.; He Likens the Equitable to a Farm Under Bad Management.


June 6, 1905, New York Times, SCHIFF AND COOLIDGE QUIT THE EQUITABLE; Ingalls Will -- Cassatt, Mills, and Stewart May. NO PEACE WITH HARRIMAN. Bliss Sees Hendricks -- Hyde Prepares to Fight an Ouster -- After a Man of national Prominence.


June 6, 1906, New York Times, NEW YELLOW DOG FUND FOUND IN THE MUTUAL; Dr. Gillette Recently Turned Over $10,000 of It. GRAND JURY THE DISCOVERER, The News Surprised the Company Officials and Caused Mr. Jerome to Send for Vouchers.
Through testimony which Dr. Walter R. Gillette, formerly Vice President of the Mutual Life Insurance Company, gave before the Special Grand Jury a week ago, an important "yellow dog" fund has come to light in the Mutual Life of which no trace was ever found either by the Armstrong investigators or by the Truesdale Committee, which has had fifty accountants at work on the Mutual's books for seven months.


June 7, 1905, New York Times, NEW EQUITABLE HEAD STILL BEING SOUGHT; Judge Gray, Shaw, and Herrick Talked Of for the Place. MAY BE NO CHOICE TO-DAY, Reorganization of the Executive Committee Likely to Go Through -- Anxious About Hendricks Report.


June 7, 1905, New York Times, Agree with Frick Report., BOSTON, June 6.---The special protective committee of the New England policy holders of the Equitable Life Asssurance Society met here to-day to discuss plans for future action. The committee at a meeting on May 19 reported in substance that evils in the present situation could not be remedied by the mere substitution of other officers for those now in control nor of the mere recovery of the profits wrongfully diverted from the society, and that radical changes in the system were essential. The committee's recommendations were in most respects like those contained in the Frick report which the Equitable Board of Directors failed to accept in New York recently. No definite action was taken to-day. Another meeting will be held within a day or two.


June 8, 1905, New York Times, CHOATE IS DELIGHTED TO BE BACK AGAIN; Hasn't Been Consulted About Equitable Chairmanship. GOING TO TAKE A REST, Undecided as to the Law or the Ministry, "What Would You Do ?" He Asks a Reporter.


June 8, 1905, New York Times, HYDE AND ALEXANDER REFUSE TO RESIGN; J.T. Low Quits -- Two More Equitable Directors' Resign. REORGANIZATION PLAN UP. Salaries and Expenses to be Reduced -- Warm Talk by Smith and Others at Meeting.
Joseph T. Low, Brayton Ives, and Charles Stewart Smith tried in vain in the meeting of the Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society yesterday to bring about the retirement of President James W. Alexander and Vice President James H. Hyde either by voluntary resignation or by resolution of the board.


June 8, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Equitable’s New Head Had Been Chosen, Nominating Committee Makes a Selection, but Keeps Name a Secret.


June 09, 1905, New York Times, Page 8, An Old Anecdote Recalled by an Equitable Report, Letter by William Edelsten,
The return of Mr. Choate to his home and the proposition to place him at the head of the Equitable Life Assurance Society makes the following anecdote of interest


June 9, 1905, New York Times, PARKER CHAIRMAN, GOULD TO BUY STOCK?; Last Night's Reports About Equitable Reconstruction. GOULD AGENTS IN MIDNIGHT TALK. Hyde Reported Ready to Sell -- Chairmanship List Now Parker, J.H. Rhoades, Gov. Deneen
There were two important developments in the Equitable Life situation last night, as the result of which the whole case may assume an entirely new phase when the Directors meet to-day.


June 9, 1905, New York Times,INGALLS STILL HAS POLICY.; Intimates That He Has Not Canceled $50,000 Equitable Risk.


June 9, 1905, New York Times, Letter, An Old Anecdote Recalled by an Equitable Report, by William Edelsten,
The return of Mr. Choate to his home and the proposition to place him at the head of the Equitable Life Assurance Society makes the following anecdote of interest:


June 10, 1905, New York Times, Ingalls Sleeps Over It.; Declined to Talk Last Night About Equitable Changes.


June 10, 1905, New York Times, THE EQUITABLE, MR. HYDE, AND MR. MORTON. Whatever may have been Mr. JAMES H. HYDE'S faults of conduct in the past, and however well justified some of the criticisms which have been passed upon him, he has in order to put an end to the troubles of the Equitable Society made a sacrifice of which perhaps few men in this community would have been capable.


June 10, 1905, New York Times, RYAN SYNDICATE BUYS HYDE STOCK; Paul Morton Chosen for Equitable Chairman. ALL HIGH OFFICERS RESIGN Hendricks's Report Will Shape Action on Them. STOCK TO BE TRUSTEED. Grover Cleveland, George Westinghouse, and Justice O'Brien Asked to Serve -- Price of Stock Said to be $4,000,000.
By the sale of the stock of the Equitable Life Assurance Society belonging to the estate of the late Henry B. Hyde, its founder, to a syndicate of which Thomas F. Ryan is the head, the control of the great institution, with its $400,000,000 of assets, passed out of the Hyde family yesterday, and the way was paved for a thorough reorganization.


Jan. 10, 1912, The Evening World, page 7, No Thought Yet Of Building New Equitable Home,


June 11, 1905, New York Times, MORTON RIGHT FOR THE PLACE.; A Good Man, Says M.E. Ingalls, Late of the Equitable Directorate.


June 11, 1905, New York Times, STRONG STOCK MARKET.; Equitable Settlement Given as One Reason for the Bulge.


June 11, 1905, New York Times, EQUITABLE ADOPTS SAVINGS BANK PLAN; New Interests Will Restrict Its Investments -- Cleveland Accepts as a Public Duty.
Following closely upon the purchase of the controlling stock of the Equitable Life Assurance Society by the syndicate of which Thomas F. Ryan is the head, it was learned yesterday that the new interests had determined to place the investments of the society on practically a savings bank basis.


June 11, 1905, New York Times, Editorial, MR. RYAN AND THE EQUITABLE.


June 11, 1905, New York Times, MORTON RIGHT FOR THE PLACE.;
A Good Man, Says M.E. Ingalls, Late of the Equitable Directorate.


June 12, 1905, New York Times, WAIT ON HENDRICKS.; Lull in Equitable Matters Until Superintendent Makes Report.


June 13, 1905, New York Times, HOW CLEVELAND VIEWS HIS EQUITABLE TRUST; The ex-President's Letter of Acceptance Made Public. PLEA FOR OLD STANDARDS. Mr. Ryan Says His Purchase of the Stock Was Unconditional -- Hendricks Report Out Soon.
Ex-President Grover Cleveland has sent to Thomas F. Ryan a letter in which he accedes to the request that he become one of the Trustees of the majority stock of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, recently purchased from James Hazen Hyde by a syndicate of which Mr. Ryan is the head.


June 14, 1905, New York Times, NEW SAFE DEPOSIT COMPANY.; Empire City Is Backed by Mutual and Equitable Financiers.


June 14, 1905, New York Times, HENDRICKS REOPENS EQUITABLE INQUIRY; Will Cover New Points -- May Delay His Report. TO TAKE UP RYAN PURCHASE. Complete Mutualization a Possibility of Present Situation -- Frick-Harriman Syndicate Was a Bidder,
Superintendent Hendricks of the State Insurance Department, it was learned yesterday, has reopened his investigation into the Equitable Life Assurance Society's affairs to determine finally several points that have arisen during the preparation of his report, and to cover the recent sale of the Equitable stock formerly belonging to the Henry B. Hyde estate to the syndicate of which Thomas F. Ryan is the head.


June 14, 1905, The World, page 1, Hendricks May Show Hostility To Equitable, Rumor thet State Superintendent Will Make Sweeping Criticisms.


June 15, 1905, New York Times, NO EQUITABLE CHANGE YET.; No Reorganization Until Hendricks Files His Report.
The expected reorganization of the Executive Committee of the Equitable Life Assurance Society was not put through yesterday, Paul Morton, the Chairman of the Board of Directors, having decided to wait upon the report of Superintendent Hendricks of the State Insurance Department on Equitable affairs before taking any steps in the matter.


June 16, 1905, New York Times, INTEREST IN GERMANY.; Rivals of Equitable Inciting Policy Holders to Demand Representation.
BERLIN, June 15.--The policy holders of the New York Equitable Life Assurance Society in Germany want to be represented on the board of the reorganized company. This is one of the objects of the sub-committee appointed by the General Committee of the Association of German Fire Insurance Companies, which includes life insurance companies and those doing both life and fire business.


June 16, 1905, New York Times, JEROME NOW ATTACKS EQUITABLE FINANCIERS; Compares Some of Their Deals with Larry Summerfield's.
SORRY THEY'RE OUTSIDE LAW. Tells of the Letters He Receives Asking Why He Doesn't Prosecute and Advocates Stricter Laws.
District Attorney William Travers Jerome, at a dinner given in his honor last night by the Merchants' Protective Association, declared that the actions of some eminent gentlemen associated with the Equitable Life Assurance Society were no whit less immoral than the actions of "Larry" Summerfield, confidence man, and urged the necessity for laws which would adequately deal with crimes in high finance.


June 16, 1905, New York Times, RYAN ALONE OWNS J.H. HYDE'S STOCK; Paid $2,500,000 for It, He Tells Equitable Trustees. TRUST AGREEMENT ACCEPTED. Trustees Meet and Ask the Policy Holders to Help in Selecting Directors.
Grover Cleveland, Morgan J. O'Brien, and George Westinghouse, the three trustees selected by Thomas F. Ryan to vote the Equitable Life Assurance stock recently purchased by him from James Hazen Hyde, sat in conference in the Hotel Buckingham most of yesterday.


June 16, 1905, New York Times, THE POSITION OF THE EQUITABLE.


June 17, 1905, New York Times, CRIMMINS COMMITTEE SATISFIED WITH PLAN; Tells Policy Holders the Equitable Will Be Restored to Favor. CHARTER MAY BE AMENDED. To Get Around Difficulty of Directors Owning Stock -- Action Depends on Lord Suit Decision.
The Crimmins committee of Equitable Life policy holders came out yesterday in favor of the plans now being carried out for the reorganization of the company and for the change in its stock control. In a long letter addressed to the policy holders of the Equitable the committee recites the history of its labors and concludes.
The Crimmins committee of Equitable Life policy holders came out yesterday in favor of the plans now being carried out for the reorganization of the company and for the change in its stock control. In a long letter addressed to the policy holders of the Equitable the committee recites the history of its labors and (concludes D3)


June 18, 1905, New York Times, POLICY HOLDERS ON BOARD.; Equitable Trustees Agree That This Can Be Done, Ryan Says.


June 18, 1905, New York Times, Section Three, First Magazine Section, Page SM1, Character Study of the Man Who Cut the Gordian Knot of the Equitable Tangle. by William Griffetth,


June 19, 1905, New York Times, CRITICISM A SAFEGUARD.; Bowdoin's President Cites Equitable Insurance Affair as Example.


June 19, 1905, New York Times, HIGGINS RETURNS TO ALBANY.; He Discusses the Report on the Equitable with Supt. Hendricks.
ALBANY, N.Y., June 18. -- Gov. Higgins returned to Albany early this morning from his fortnight's trip to the West and to Cambridge Springs, Penn., and will remain here for the present, especially in view of the extraordinary session of the Legislature, which will convene at noon next Wednesday.


June 20, 1905, New York Times, HICKEY, POLICEMAN, TURNS IN HIS POLICY; Takes His Revolver, Too, Down to the Equitable's Office.
THE CLERKS PROMPTLY DUCK. Robert McNaught, ex-Detective, Helps to Smooth Over a Somewhat Embarrassing Situation.
Up to the cashier's desk in the main office of the Equitable Life Assurance Society at 120 Broadway yesterday afternoon walked Patrick J. Hickey, policeman. In his left hand he held an Equitable policy. His right hand rested upon the rim of his hip pocket. Hickey was in plain clothes, but he wore his badge, No. 6,467, on his suspenders, and his coat was thrown back.


June 20, 1905, New York Times, MORTON, TOO, WILL HAVE AN EQUITABLE INQUIRY; Engages Public Accountants to Go Over the Society's Books. FOR A FULL INVESTIGATION. Wants It to Cover Points of Hendricks and Frick Reports, Expenses, Investments, and Surpluses.
Paul Morton, the newly elected Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, has determined to have an investigation all his own. To this end he addressed yesterday to Price, Waterhouse Co. and Haskins Sells, two firms of public accountants, a letter outlining the scope of the inquiry that he desires made.


June 20, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Equitable Report Comes Out Thursday, Gov. Higgins Says that Hendricks's Findings May Then Be Announced.


June 21, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, State Will Sue For Return Of Equitable Cash, Attorney-General Mayer Preparing to Follow the Report of Supt. Hendricks with Sweeping Action in the Courts Against Directors.


June 21, 1905, New York Times, ALEXANDER AND HYDE OUT OF EQUITABLE; Morton Accepts Their Resignations as Officers. HYDE ASKED TO BE RELIEVED. May Have the Courts Pass on Syndicate Profits Now -- Hendricks to Report To-morrow.
Paul Morton, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, announced yesterday that he had accepted the resignations of President James W. Alexander and Vice President James H. Hyde, which were tendered to him ten days ago, when he was elected to his present office.


June 22, 1905, New York Times, ROOSEVELT SEVERE ON THE EQUITABLE; Crooked Methods, He Says -- Wants Federal Supervision. INDORSES MORTON AS CHIEF. Letter Included in Correspondence Over Santa Fe Prosecution -- Moody Upheld.
WASHINGTON, June 21. -- President Roosevelt, in a letter to Paul Morton, has declared that "crooked and objectionable practices have hitherto prevailed" in the Equitable Assurance Society, and has also declared that the Equitable trouble has furnished another argument for Federal supervision of insurance.


June 22, 1905, New York Times, Full Text of the Hendricks Report, Henry B. and J. H. Hyde, Alexander and Directors Censured. LEASES UNJUST, SALARIES HIGH. No Substantial Evidence Against Tarbell, Superintendent of Insurance Says -- Syndicate Deals Attacked.


June 22, 1905, Binghamton Press, Hendricks Flays Many, Officials of Equitable Will Be Sued. Complete Mutualization Is Advocated
Equitable Society's Leases Are Scored by the Superintendent of Insurance as Being "One Sided." SUPERFICIAL MEASURES CANNOT CURE EVILS. "Complete Mutualization, With Elimination of the Stock," Only Sure Measure of Relief.


June 22, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Belmont Resigns From Equitable, Sends a Letter to Grover Cleveland as Chairman of Board of Trustees, Ignring Paul Morton, Representative of Ryan.


June 22, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Higgins To Aid In Prosecuting Equitable Men, Governor Says He Will Help District-Attorney Jerome in Every Way.


June 22, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Hyde Angry Ar Harsh Criticism,.


June 23, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Courts To Stay At Work To Try Equitable Men,, District-Attorney Jerome Arranges with Recorder Goff and Justice Davy to Remain at Posts and Hear Criminal Cases That May Be Brought.


June 23, 1905, New York Times, Front Page, Mayer Preparing Equitable Suits, To Recover Wrongful Profits, to Debar, to Get Accounting. CRIMINAL END FOR JEROME
With the Aid of the Governor and Republican Administration Promised—Depew and Hill Fees Discussed


June 23, 1905, New York Times, Editorial, THE FUTURE OF THE EQUITABLE.


June 23, 1905, New York Times, MAYER PREPARING EQUITABLE SUITS; To Recover Wrongful Profits, to Debar, to Get Accounting. CRIMINAL END FOR JEROME. With the Aid of the Governor and Republican Administration Promised -- Depew and Hill Fees Discussed. MAYER PREPARING EQUITABLE SUITS.
Attorney General Julius M. Mayer, upon his return from Washington last night, announced the legal programme which the State administration is determined to carry out in regard to the Equitable Life Assurance Society affair with, it is declared, all the power at its command. Under this programme the Attorney General will institute suits forthwith as follows.


June 24, 1905, New York Times, MARSE SYDNEY MUDD CALLS.; Drops In on President and Tells Morton He Wants an Equitable Policy.


June 24, 1905, New York Times, POLICY HOLDERS MAY PROSECUTE; Their Action Will be Independent of the District Attorney's. EQUITABLE HOLDS COURTS OPEN. Jerome Asks Delay Pending His Inquiry -- Mayer Busy With Hendricks Testimony.
District Attorney Jerome obtained the consent of two Judges of the Criminal Court yesterday to sit during the Summer, so that if criminal action is warrantel in the Equitable case there may be no delay.


June 24, 1905, New York Times, Front Page, Policy Holders May Prosecute, Their Action Will be Independent of the District Attorney's EQUITABLE HOLDS COURTS OPEN. Jerome Asks Delay Pending His Inquiry—Mayer Busy With Hendricks Testimony District Attorney Jerome obtained, the consent of two Judges of the Criminal
Court yesterday to sit during the Summer, so that if criminal action is warranted in the Equitable case there may be no delay.


June 25, 1905, New York Times, ALEXANDER VERY ILL; SON RETURNS PROFITS; Restores to Equitable Father's Syndicate Proceeds.
PRESIDENT UNAWARE HE IS OUT. Recent Developments Kept From Him -- Mayer and Morton May Bring Others to Book.
While James W. Alexander, formerly President of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, was lying ill at the home of his daughter, Mrs. John W. Alexander, unaware even that his resignation from the society with which he has been connected for more than forty years had been accepted, his son, Henry M. Alexander made restitution to the Equitable yesterday of his father's share of the syndicate profits of "James H. Hyde and Associates."


June 25, 1905, New York Times, MORTON AND THE EQUITABLE.; A Policy Holder on His Conduct as Vice President of the Santa Fe.


June 26, 1905, New York Times, EQUITABLE AGENTS SEEK A VOICE IN THE BOARD?; Linger Here and Make Inquiries for Stray Stock. HOPE TO BECOME DIRECTORS. Or at Least to Name a Few -- General Agents of the Society Said to Have Reached an Understanding.
Several general agents of the Equitable Life Assurance Society who came here several weeks ago when the Alexander-Hyde dispute started have not returned to their districts. Some of those who went back have returned. A good deal of speculation was indulged in concerning the cause of their being here.


[Text] June 26, 1905, New York Times, Front Page, Equitable Agents See A Voice In the Board? Linger Here and Make Inquiries for Stray Stock.
HOPE TO BECOME DIRECTORS. Or at Least to Name a Few—General Agents of the Society Said to Have Reached an Understanding.


June 26, 1905, New York Times, Front Page, Equitable Agents See A Voice In the Board? Linger Here and Make Inquiries for Stray Stock. HOPE TO BECOME DIRECTORS. Or at Least to Name a Few—General Agents of the Society Said to Have Reached an Understanding.


June 27, 1905, New York Times, Dodge and Smith Quit the Equitable, Do Not Want to Embarrass Morton in the Board. J. J. ASTOR REPORTED OUT. For the Same Reason—Morton to Join State Authorities in Suits—Some Fees Stopped.
It became known late last night that Charles Stewart Smith and Marcellus Hartley Dodge, who were qualified as Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society by holding Hyde stock, had placed their resignations in the hands of Paul Morton, Chairman of the board, in order that the trustees might not be embarrassed by their retention of office under that qualification.


June 27, 1905, New York Times, DODGE AND SMITH QUIT THE EQUITABLE; Do Not Want to Embarrass Morton in the Board. J.J. ASTOR REPORTED OUT For the Same Reason -- Morton to Join State Authorities in Suits -- Some Fees Stopped.
It became known late last night that Charles Stewart Smith and Marcellus Hartley Dodge, who were qualified as Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society by holding Hyde stock, had placed their resignations in the hands of Paul Morton, Chairman of the board, in order that the trustees might not be embarrassed by their retention of office under that qualification.


June 27, 1905, New York Times, ODELL IN WALL STREET; IS MUTE ON EQUITABLE; Visit May Bear on Talk of Legislative Inquiry. SAYS, 'I'M NOT THE GOVERNOR'. Chairman Confers with Quigg, Who Is Supposed to be Intimately Associated with Thomas F. Ryan
State Chairman Odell came to the city from Newburg yesterday for the first time in nearly a week. He spent most of the morning in the financial district, and later in the day he had a talk at headquarters with Lemuel E. Quigg, who is now generally understood to be the political representative of Thomas F. Ryan.


June 28, 1905, New York Times, ALL HYDE DIRECTIONS TO QUIT THE EQUITABLE; Merely That Morton May Have Free Hand -- May Return. BUT ASTOR WILL STAY OUT. Ryan Trustees Considering Names to Fill Vacancies on the Board -- May Recommend Members To-day.
To-day's meeting of the Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society will, it is expected, see in the hands of the Trustees or of Chairman Morton of the board the resignations of all or nearly all the Directors who were qualified by the stock of the Henry B. Hyde estate. Although no other resignations than those of Charles Stewart Smith, John Jacob Astor, and Marcellus Hartley Dodge were announced yesterday.


June 28, 1905, New York Times, TAKES ROOSEVELT'S WORD.; Recommendation of Morton Halts Governor in Equitable Matter.
ALBANY, June 27. -- From advisers of Gov. Higgins it was learned to-day that the Governor has now made up his mind not to bring before the Legislature the affairs of the Equitable unless there should be an insistent and overwhelming demand for such action on his part by the policy holders.


June 28, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Trustees Pick 12 Directors For Equitable, Ryan's Representatives Said to have Agreed on names to Be Reported.


June 29, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Depew’s Salary Cut By Equitable


June 29, 1905, New-York Tribune, Nine New Directors, page 1, HYDE DEFENDS FATHER. Equitable Trustee's Statement to Policyholders---More Resignations.
Nine men, all policyholders in the Equitable, were named by the trustees of the Ryan stock control at their meeting at the Hotel Buckingham yesterday to fill vacancies in the directorate. The men named are E. B. Thomas, New York, president of the Lehigh Valley Railway Company; F. G. Bourne. New-York, president of the Singer Manufacturing Company; William Whitman, Boston, Mass.; John J. Albright, Buffalo, N. Y.; F. W. Roebling, Trenton, N. J.; J. D. Schmidlapp, president Union Savings Bank and Trust Company, Cincinnati: E. W. Robertson. Columbia, S. C; Joseph Bryan, Richmond, Va., and E. W. Bloomingdale, New-York.


[Text] June 29, 1905, New-York Tribune, Nine New Directors, page 1, HYDE DEFENDS FATHER. Equitable Trustee's Statement to Policyholders---More Resignations.


June 29, 1905, New York Times, Letter, Mr. Morton and the Equitable.


June 29, 1905, New York Times, HYDE'S REPLY TO HENDRICKS CHARGES; Complaints Carefully Looked Up, His Answers Overlooked. DEFENDS FATHER'S LEASES. Says Elder Hyde Took Personal Money Risks for the Equitable's Good, Not for His Own Gain.
James H. Hyde at yesterday's meeting of the Board of Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society read this reply to the charges made by Superintendent Hendricks in his report against Mr. Hyde and his father, Henry B. Hyde:


June 29, 1905, New York Times, NINE NEW DIRECTORS FOR THE EQUITABLE; President Thomas of the Lehigh First on the List Elected. MAY ACT AS POLICY HOLDERS. Resignations of 21 of Old Board Accepted -- Trustees Vouch for Society -- Hyde Answers Hendricks.


June 29, 1905, New York Times, THE EQUITABLE TRUSTEES. Editorial,
The Trustees chosen by Mr. RYAN to select Directors for the Equitable have announced the names of nine gentlemen from different parts of the country to fill vacancies existing in the board. It is safe to say that the standard of ability, character, and reputation applied in these nominations could not possibly have been improved in any practicable mode of selection by the policy holders


June 30, 1905, New York Times, MORE RETURN PROFITS OF SYNDICATE DEALS; Equitable Suits, Except in Hyde's Case, Probably Avoided. DEPEW AND HILL CUT OFF. Retainers of $20,000 and $5,000 a Year Discontinued -- List of Those Considered for Directors.
It was learned late yesterday that the example set by ex-President James W. Alexander of the Equitable Life Assurance Society in returning his share of the underwriting profits which the "James H. Hyde and Associates" syndicates made on issues of securities of which the Equitable made purchases had been followed by other of the syndicate members.


June 30, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Hyde Resigns One More Job In Equitable, Quits Chairmanship of the Executive Committee--- W.H. McIntyre Out



July 1, 1905, Watertown Daily Times, Thomas F. Ryan, New Controlling Figure of the Equitable.


July 3, 1905, New York Times, Declares Hyde Denial Confirms Accusations; Driscoll Answers Letter Sent to Equitable Directors. DEALS OF HENRY B. HYDE. Subsidiary Concerns Through Which He Is Said to Have Profited at Expense of Policy Holders.
SYRACUSE, July 2. -- Before leaving this city for the West to join Secretary Taft's party to the Philippines Congressman M.E. Driscoll of the Twenty-ninth New York District, who was the investigating attorney for Superintendent of Insurance Hendricks in the Equitable inquiry, made a statement on the letter sent some days ago by James H. Hyde to the Board of Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society.


July 4, 1905, New York Times, Letter, A Suggestion for the Equitable.


July 5, 1905, The Evening World, page 1, Policy-Holders Will Profit By Sneak Bill, Clause in Law Inserted by Henry B. Hyde Entitles Them to Surplus. SHARE IN $78,000,000. Senator Brackett Will Ask Court of Appeals to Pass On Question at Once.


July 5, 1905, New York Times, Future Of the Equitable, Can the Conditions of the Trust Agreement Be Enforced?


July 6, 1905, New York Times, Grand Jury to Get the Equitable Case; Members Warned That They May Have to Sit All Summer. LAWYERS HAVE MANY TALKS Untermyer, However, Will Sail for Europe, Despite Reports of Contemplated Criminal Actions.
Judge Foster in General Sessions yesterday made pointed reference to the Equitable Life Assurance Society affair in charging the July Grand Jury.
He said..


July 7, 1905, New York Times, Page 7, Mayer Gets the Testimony; Hendricks and Higgins Talk Over the Equitable's Affairs.
ALBANY, N.Y., July 6. -- Attorney General Mayer to-day received a copy of the testimony taken in the Hendricks investigation of the affairs of the Equitable Life Assurance Society. He has said that he must study this before deciding in what form he will bring an action under the findings of Superintendent Hendricks's report.


July 8, 1905, New York Times, EQUITABLE TRUSTEES TO HAVE ACTIVE CHARGE; Will Pass on All Plans for Reorganizing the Society. MR. CLEVELAND WON'T RETIRE He Issues a Statement Saying That the Idea Has Not Entered His Mind -- Choosing New Directors.
The publication of a report from Philadelphia to the effect that Grover Cleveland had about made up his mind to resign as one of the Trustees of the majority stock of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, brought from Mr. Cleveland, who was at the Buckingham, a prompt and explicit denial yesterday.


July 11, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Directors Will Be Sued Soon, Arranged at a Conference of Prosecutors and Counsel. TRUSTEES CONSIDER NAMES. Preparing to Nominate to Fill Vacancies -- Rumor That Depew's Resignation May Be Demanded.
Following a luncheon conference between Attorney General Mayer, District Attorney Jerome, Samuel Untermyer, counsel for James H. Hyde, and Edward Lauterbach of the Alexander counsel at a down-town restaurant yesterday the programme of the State authorities in the Equitable Life Assurance matter became pretty definitely known.


[Text] The Minneapolis Journal, July 11, 1905, Equitable Graft Exposure Made. Remarkable Disclosures of Dealings by Hyde, Depew, Schiff, Alexander and Others. Hendricks' Searchlight Throws Into Prominence the Ways of Frenzied Finance.


July 11, 1905, The Evening World, page 1, Equitable Life Lost; We Won Profits, Say Heads, The World's Disclosure of Testimony Reveals Amazing Confessions. SWORE TO THEIR GAINS. Voted Funds of Company to Buy or to Sell for Thier Advantage. SCHIFF CHARGES FALSIFYING. DEPEW NEVER SENT HIS BILL. SCHIFF "DUMMY" UNTIL RECENTLY. HYDE INVLOVED ALEXANDER TOO. ALEXANDER SAYS HE DIDN'T KNOW. McINTYRE SAYS HYDE PROFITED. SCHIFF HAS A CLEAR CONSCIENCE. GAGE TARBELL TO STAY IN EQUITABLE. HENDRICKS SAYS HE KEPT IT BACK.

SYRACUSE, N.Y., July 11.--Superintendent of Insurers Hendricks was shown by an Evening World reporter this afternoon a copy of to-day's World exclusively disclosing the evidence in his Equitable investigation.
Mr. Hendricks was asked if he would say anything about the matter.
"Well, the story purports to give an immense amount of fact not disclosed in your official report," suggested the reporter.
"That may be," he replied, and he chuckled, as he added, "You know we don't always tell all we know."


July 11, 1905, The Evening World, page 8, Equitable Lost, But We Gained, Say Directors.


July 11, 1905, The Evening World, page 8, Governor Amazed, By World "Beat" Higgins Corroborates Accuracy of Exclusive Report of Hendricks Inquiry


July 11, 1905, The Evening World, page 8, Ryan Buys Another Life Insurance Co. Got Possesstion of the EWashington Life Before He Secured the Equitable.


July 12, 1905, The Evening World, page 4, Equitable's Salary List Cut By Morton, Decrease of from Ten to Rwenty Per Cent. Ordered for High-Price Men.


July 12, 1905, The Evening World, page 4, Equitable Clerk Didn’t Steal Right, Judge Foster Hits grafters In Senttencing Neumer, Who Helped Crooked Lobley


July 12, 1905, The Evening World, page 4, Higgins Again Says No Probe For EquitableI,, The Governor Disagrees with Odell as to Action of Extra Session.


[Text] July 12, 1905, Los Angeles Times, Page 1, Column 4, Depew’s Course Outrages Yale. Connection with Equitable Loudly Condemned. Discredit is Felt Keenly. “Town Topics” Is Accused. Fellow Members of the Corporation of University Trustees Clamor for Resignation of Their Old Colleague.


[Text] July 12, 1905, New York Times, Page 2, Equitable Testimony That Hendricks Got. Loan of $250,000 to a Depew Concern Valued at $150,000. RECORDS FALSE, SCHIFF SAID. They Showed U. P. Sales to Society By Kuhn, Loeb & Co.—Alexander Said He Was No Money Maker.

July 12, 1905, New York Times, Page 1, Won't Act--Higgins; Time Is Ripe--Odell, Differ as to Legislative Action on Equitable Matter,
GOVERNOR TRUSTS HENDRICKS. Says Harriman Refused to Testify Because He Had Resigned—Ordered Testimony Sent to Jerome.


July 12, 1905, New York Times, Page 3, What Would Depew Say?; Asks Brackett, Recalling an Interview on His Equitable Suit.

July 12, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Testimony That Hendricks Got; Loan of $250,000 to a Depew Concern Valued at $150,000. RECORDS FALSE, SCHIFF SAID. They Showed U.P. Sales to Society By Kuhn, Loeb & Co. -- Alexander Said He Was No Money Maker.
A summary and large section of the testimony upon which the Hendricks report on the scandals in the Equitable Life Assurance Society was based were made public yesterday by The New York World. It contains fresh revelations of dealings between United States Senator Chauncey A. Depew and the Equitable, testimony of Jacob H. Schiff in regard to the society's investments in bonds, testimony of Messrs.


July 12, 1905, New York Times, Page 1, Won’t Act --- Higgins; Time Is Ripe --- Odell; Differ as to Legislative Action on Equitable Matter, GOVERNOR TRUSTS HENDRICKS Says Harriman Refused to Testify Because He Had Resigned -- Ordered Testimony Sent to Jerome.
ALBANY, July 11. -- Gov. Higgins to-day talked freely about the Equitable situation and his own position with respect to it. He made it clear that his confidence both in the Insurance Department and its head has been unshaken by the recent disclosures, and that it is still his intention to trust to Superintendent Hendricks to complete the investigation.


July 12, 1905, New York Times, Act Now, Says Odell; Didn’t Care to be Quoted Before Against Higgins on Equitable.
NEWBURG, July 11. -- Former Gov. Odell read the evidence secured by Superintendent Hendricks in the Equitable matter and published in The New York World to-day, and also an editorial in the same paper. Referring to the editorial, he said that any inference that he had been concerned in the preparation of the testimony was absolutely without foundation.


July 13, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, World’s Expose Of Equitable Graft Makes Albany Act, Investigation by Legislature Hurried by Exclusive Disclosure of Testimony in hendricks Hearing and Fear of Further Scandals.


July 13, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Depew Has Not Resigned, Says Morton, Chairman of Equitable Denies Senator's Statement Made in Paris.


July 13, 1905, Los Angeles Herald, Page 1, Senator Depew Denies Charges, SAYS HE WAS NOT CONCERNED IN LOAN MADE UNDER SOCIETY'S RULES, Declares Amount Loaned Would Not Have Been Given Had Not Conditions Been According to Requirements.


July 13, 1905, Los Angeles Herald, Page 2, Column 4, Morton Makes Cuts in Pay-Roll. REDUCTIONS IN EQUITABLE SALARIES. PLAN TO REDUCE EXPENSES. It Is Said That This Move Will Be Followed by Reforms In Other Departments of the Society, by Associated Press,



July 13, 1905, New York Times, Schiff Is Blameless, Westinghouse Writes; Trustee Tells Banker So in a Letter on the Equitable Deal. MORTON PARES THE SALARIES. A 20 Per Cent. Decrease in All Over $15,000 -- A Saving Already of $49,000.
George Westinghouse, who, with Grover Cleveland and Supreme Court Justice Morgan J. O'Brien, is serving as Trustee of the Ryan stock in the Equitable Life Assurance Society, has written a letter to Jacob H. Schiff of Kuhn, Loeb Co., holding the banker blameless in the transactions between his firm and the Equitable Society.

July 13, 1905, New York Times, Page 1, Higgins Stands Out On the Equitable, Although Leaders Join Odell in Asking Legislative Inquiry. NONE TO FRAME BILL, HE SAYS Malby, Stevens, Page, and Brackett Speak -- Governor Says Odell Is Not Likely to Influence Him. Although Leaders Join Odell in Asking Legislative Inquiry. NONE TO FRAME BILL, HE SAYS
Malby, Stevens, Page, and Brackett Speak -- Governor Says Odell Is Not Likely to Influence Him.


July 13, 1905, New York Times, Odell Fighting Higgins, Politics Back of Equitable Disclosures, Albany Believes.
ALBANY, July 12. -- As a result of the publication of the evidence taken by Superintendent of Insurance Hendricks in the investigation of the affairs of the Equitable Life Assurance Society and of the declaration by State Chairman Odell, immediately following, that he thought it justified drastic and immediate action by the Legislature, there is certain to be a break between the Governor and the State Chairman, according to the inside political gossip here to-night.


July 14, 1905, New York Times, Higgins and Odell Have Parted Now; Publication of Equitable Evidence Called a Foul Blow. HIGGINS STILL AGAINST ACTION. His Friends Say That He Is the Victim of Treachery -- An Inquiry May Be Openly Demanded.
ALBANY, July 13. -- Gov. Higgins and State Chairman Odell have come to the parting of the ways. That statement can be made definitely and positively. Henceforth, although a certain appearance of harmony may be kept up, there will be no confidential relations between the Executive of the State and the leader of the Republican State organization.


July 15, 1905, New York Times, The Equitable Elects Twelve New Directors; Among Them Are President Butler and D Cady Herrick. JEROME AND HUNTER AT ODDS. District Attorney Talks of John Doe Proceedings to Get a Copy of Hendricks Inquiry Testimony.
The Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society met in special session yesterday afternoon, and elected twelve new members on the recommendation of the Trustees to fill vacancies existing in the board.


July 17, 1905, New York Times, Hendricks Defends Equitable Report; Says No One Edited It -- No Reason for Calling Harriman. HE DIDN'T GIVE OUT TESTIMONY Only Copy That Left His Department Went to Mayer -- Nothing Suppressed, He Asserts.


[Text] The evening world., July 18, 1905, Evening Edition, Image 8, Did Equitable Pay "Ship" Claims?


July 20, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Governor Yields To the World’s Demand For Investigation Of the Equitable,
So Impressed by the Continued Revelations of Insurance Scandals that He Sends a Message to the Legislature Recommending the Appointment of a Joint Committee to Suggest Needed Reforms.



July 20, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, $685,000 Equitable Loan Not Recorded, Bank Examiner Judson Asserts that Item Is Not on Books of mercantile Trust Company, Which He Has Examined.



July 20, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Morton Glad There Will Be An Inquiry, He Will Do All Ne Can to See that the Equitable End Will Be Far-Reaching.


July 20, 1905, New York Times,Morton Removes Controller Jordan, For Refusing to Tell About The $685,000 Equitable Loan. WILLIAM A. DAY IN HIS PLACE. Westinghouse Suggests Turning Stock Over to 5,000 Policy Holders -- Mayer to Sue All the Old Directors. MORTON REMOVES CONTROLLER JORDAN.
Thomas D. Jordan was removed yesterday as Controller of the Equitable Life Assurance Society by Chairman Paul Morton because he refused to tell Mr. Morton what he knew about the $685,000 loan that Superintendent of Insurance Hendricks found on the books of the Mercantile Trust Company standing in the names of ex-President James W. Alexander and M. Jordan as Trustees.

July 20, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Reorganization.
Mr. Westinghouse’s plan for reorganizing the Equitable comes in a fortunate moment. With the exception of Mr. Ryan’s purchase of the stock control of the Society, every move thus far made since the beginning of the controversy has been inquisitory and destructive. Mr. Westinghouse’s contribution is contribution is remedial and uplifting.


July 21, 1905, New York Times, Heat Bad For Alexander, The Equitable's Former President Has a Set-Back.
BAY SHORE, L.I., July 20. -- James W. Alexander, formerly President of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, is said not to have stood the period of


July 21, New York Times, Page 1, Chief Trust Hunter Gone, W. A. Day's Acceptance of Equitable Office May Retard Prosecutions.
WASHINGTON, July 20. -- The acceptance by Assistant Attorney General W.A. Day of the place of Controller of the Equitable Life Assurance Society has aroused much comment here, in view of the criticisms passed by Secretary Taft on Engineer Wallace for leaving an important Government post for "mere lucre."extreme heat well, and is far from being as well to-day as he was earlier this week.


July 21, 1905, New York Times, What Hendricks Will Do, Will Continue His Equitable Inquiry as to Solvency Alone.
SYRACUSE, July 20. -- Insurance Superintendent Francis Hendricks said this afternoon that he favored the appointment of a legislative committee to investigate the affairs of the Equitable and other big life insurance companies.


July 22, 1905, New York Times, Higgins Faced About To Save Hendricks; Who Was Made III by Agitation for an Equitable Inquiry. HE THREATENED TO RESIGN Then the Governor Gave Ear to His Old Friend's Plea and Sent In His Message.ALBANY, July 21. -- That Gov. Higgins finally did decide to have a legislative investigation of the affairs of the Equitable and other insurance companies doing business in the State is of immeasurably more importance than why he did it. Nevertheless, an explanation of the motive which led him to so completely reverse himself was still sought by many to-day.

July 22, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Mrs. Hyde's Big Pension Is Stopped, $25,000 a Year Paid to the Widow of the Equitable Founder Is Cut Off.



July 22, 1905, New York Times, J.H. Hyde’s Own Check Paid $685,000 Loan; Chairman Morton Has Discovered No Equitable Record of It. MEN WHO GOT MONEY NAMED State Examiners Get a List from Mercantile Trust Co. -- Odell and Wood Settlements Not Involved. J.H. HYDE'S OWN CHECK PAID $685,000 LOAN
Most of the mystery remaining about the $685,000 loan which the Mercantile Trust Company had standing on its books to the joint account of ex-President James W. Alexander and ex-Controller Thomas D. Jordan of the Equitable Life Assurance Society when State Superintendent of Insurance Hendricks made his investigation was removed yesterday.


July 24, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Graft Board Men Favor Equitable, Four Members of the Joint Legislatuve Committee Declared in Favor
of Corporation Interests-- Friendship for Depew Will Count in the State Inquiry.


July 24, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Equitable Under Full Graft Fire,


July 25, 1905, New York Times, Jerome Has A Talk With E.H. Harriman, And Finds Equitable Was Not a Party to U.P. Agreement. HE ALSO SEES MR. SCHIFF. No Reason Why Hendricks Shouldn't Have Seen the Agreement, the District Attorney Says. EQUITABLE NOT A PARTY TO U.P. AGREEMENT
Hearing that Edward H. Harriman intended to start to-day for a six months' tour of Japan and other far-off lands, District Attorney Jerome on his return from Lakeville yesterday went to see the President of the Union Pacific Railroad and asked to see the syndicate agreement for the issuance of the $50,000,000 preferred stock in 1903 which gave Superintendent Hendricks of the Insurance Department so much trouble to locate in his investigation of Equitable affairs.


July 26, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Morton Now President Of Equitable, Retains Chairmanship of Board of Directors, but Is Also Elected Head., WILL AMEND CHARTER. Resignations of Alexander and Stranahan as Directors Have Been Accepted. FORMER CHEIF LOST WEIGHT. Hyde's Associate Leaves Babylon for Catskills in Care of Constant Nurse.


July 27, 1905, No More Syndicates For the Equitable, Directors Also Favor Separation from Subsidiary Companies. APPROVE ECONOMY PLANS. Alexander's Resignation as Director Accepted, and Morton Elected President of the Society.
Several of the new Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, at a meeting yesterday at which Paul Morton was elected President and the resignation of ex-President James W. Alexander from the board was accepted, made it perfectly plain that they did not propose in future to permit the entanglement of the personal interests of any officer or Director with those of the society.


July 28, 1905, New York Times, Asks Court To Wind Up Equitable’s Affairs, J.W. Brown Serves the Society with an Amended Complaint. SAYS TRUST IS DANGEROUS. And Declares That the Seeking of New Business Is Unjust to the Old Policy Holders.


July 29, 1905, The Evening World, page 3, Depew, With "Explanation" Is Near Home, Senator, on St Paul, Due To-Night, Comes to Give Light on Acts in Equitable.


July 29, 1905, New York Times, Morton Dismisses Haynes Summarily, Equitable's Metropolitan Agent Talked Too Much, It Is Said. HE OWES $800,000 ADVANCES. Chairman's Action in This Case Taken as a Warning to Other Agents -- A Reduction in Pensions.


July 30, 1905, New York Times, Find Loans To Agents By Equitable Trust, State Banking Department Completes Its Examination. ADVANCES WERE GUARANTEED. Insurance Company Thus Wasted a Large Sum, According to the Report of Supt. Hendricks.
The State Banking Department, it was learned yesterday, has just completed an examination of the affairs of the Equitable Trust Company, with special reference to its relations with the Equitable Life Assurance Society. It was undertaken as the regular semi-annual examination of the Banking Department, but its indirect object was to bring out whatever facts there might be in the affairs of the Equitable Trust that were of interest to the Equitable Life investigators.


July 30, 1905, New York Times, Finds Sidney Ripley a Faithful Trustee; Referee Disapproves Brother's Suit for an Accounting. HARRY RIPLEY OWED $100,000 And at His Request James Hazen Hyde's Brother-in-Law Tried to Extricate Him.Hamilton Odell, as referee, in a report filed in the Supreme Court yesterday, recommends the dismissal of the charges made against the late Sidney Dillon Ripley by his brother, Harry Dillon Ripley. Harry Dillon Ripley in 1899 urged his brother to take charge of his financial affairs, after he had run into debt to the extent of $100,000.


July 31, 1905, New York Times, Depew Not Ready Yet; But Really Will Tell All About Equitable -- Trustees' Plans.
Senator Depew said yesterday that he was not yet prepared to make a statement in regard to his connection, with the Equitable Life Asurance Society and other concerns, but that he would do so in a few days.




August 1, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Suits Begun By Mayer, Harriman Was Served Before He Left for Japan. PERHAPS HE WON'T TESTIFY. The Attorney General Refuses to Say Whether He Will Be Called -- Asks Division of Surplus. EQUITABLE SUITS BEGUN BY MAYER
Attorney General Julius M. Mayer began suit yesterday on behalf of the people of the State of New York against the Equitable Life Assurance Society and the forty-nine men now living who were its Directors during the period covered by the investigation which the State authorities have made into the Equitable's affairs.


August 02, 1905, New York Times,$750,000,000.; Back of Any Judgments That May Be Got Against Equitable, Back of Any Judgments That May Be Got Against Equitable Directors.


August 2, 1905, The Evening World, page 1, Jerome Wants Special Grand Jury In Equitable Cases, District-Attorney Expects to Take Up Prosecution on Points that May Be Divulged Through Legislative Committee's Investigation of Scandal.


August 3, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Loan Used To Stave Off Suits; Also to Swell Political Campaign Funds, It Is Declared. JEROME BUSY WITH INQUIRY May Ask for a Special Grand Jury -- Gets Court to Adjourn to Sept. 11 for His Convenience.
The buying of Equitable Life Assurance Society stock to prevent suits by the owners of that stock was one of the uses made of the $685,000 loan found on the books of the Mercantile Trust Company in the names of James W. Alexander and Thomas D. Jordan as trustees -- so said a lawyer yesterday who has been active in the Equitable controversy from the start.


August 5, 1905, New York Times, Hidden Equitable Loan Dates Back to Founder, Mercantile Trust Carried It in the Elder Hyde's Name. HARRIMAN'S OFFER FOR STOCK Was Willing to Pay Only $100,000 in View of Report Demanding That James H. Hyde Resign. HIDDEN EQUITABLE LOAN DATES BACK TO FOUNDER
The big loan that the Mercantile Trust Company carried quietly for James W. Alexander and Thomas D. Jordan, as trustees, from 1899, until Superintendent of Insurance Hendricks made his investigation of Equitable Life affairs, dates back to the days of the late Henry B. Hyde, founder of the Equitable, according to authoritative information obtained yesterday.


August 9, 1905, New York Times, Counsel Is Chosen For Equitable Inquiry; His Name Not Disclosed by Legislative Committee. MESSAGE FROM FROM C.E. HUGHES Chairman Odell at Equitable Building, but Says Not in Connection with Inquiry.
Members of the Armstrong legislative committee named to investigate the insurance situation said last night that they practically had settled on a man for counsel for the committee. They said, however, that his name would not be announced until after the meeting of the full committee at the Murray Hill Hotel to-day.


August 11, 1905, New York Times, Hughes and M’Keen with Choate to Advise, That Is the Counsel Plan of the Insurance Investigators. NONE HAS ACCEPTED YET Hughes and McKeen Will Be Employed on Equal Terms, If They Will Act -- Westerners Arrive.
Announcement was made last night by Senator Armstrong, Chairman of the Insurance Investigating Committee, of the selection of counsel for the committee.


August 16, 1905, New York Times, Barrels of Apples and $685,000 Loans; Equitable Mystery Makes Higgins Recall a Student's Checks. CHOATE DISINCLINED TO AID, But Committee Still Hopes to Get Him as Adviser -- No Meeting This Week.
Gov. Higgins arrived in the city last evening and made a few interesting remarks about the prospective investigation of the insurance companies by the joint committee of the Legislature. Gov. Higgins said he had no appointment to meet any of the members of the legislative committee, but would be glad to see them if they called on him.


August 24, 1905, New York Times, Investigate Others Too, Says Paul Morton, Equitable Only Asks That All Be Treated Alike. CHAIRMAN ARMSTRONG HERE Still Hopes Mr. Choate May Aid the Legislative Insurance Inquiry --A Meeting To-day. President Paul Morton of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, in speaking yesterday of the coming insurance investigation by the special joint committee of the Legislature said:


August 25, 1905, New York Times, Hyde Sells His Car, Edwin Hawley the Buyer -- It Cost the ex-Equitable Official $50,000.


August 27, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Answer May Forecast More Changes, Several of Old Directorate Are Still in Office, INQUIRY REPORTING SUBLET, By A.B. Sackett, Who Was to Do the Work at a High Figure Because the Committee Knew Him.
In financial circles yesterday there was much discussion of the answer filed by the attorneys of the Equitable Life Assurance Society to the suit brought by Attorney General Mayer to compel a restitution of funds which it is alleged belonged to the policy holders, but were squandered or misappropriated.


August 29, 1905, New York Times, Say Depew May Leave the Equitable Board,; Wall Street Expects Changes at To-morrow's Meeting. RYAN IS FOR RESTITUTION Says Also That He Is in Favor of Federal Supervision of Life Insurance Companies.
To-morrow's meeting of the Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society is awaited with greater interest by those concerned in the Equitable situation than any gathering of the board since the few stormy ones immediately following the report of the Frick investigating committee.


August 30, 1905, New York Times, $685,000 Loan To Be Traced By Committee, Equitable Transaction Will Be Taken Up at Outset. BOOKS MAY GIVE A CLUE, And the Society's Answer to Attorney General's Suit Indicates That Certain Defendants Knew the Facts.
Details of the $685,000 loan transaction between the Mercantile Trust Company and James W. Alexander and Thomas D. Jordan, formerly President and Controller of the Equitable Life, will shortly be in the hands of the Legislative Investigating Committee. They will figure, it is understood, at the very start of the investigation.


August 31, 1905, New York Times, Witnesses Summoned in Insurance Inquiry, Many Equitable Officers and Employes Receive Subpoenas. ALBANY RECORDS TO BE USED, Investigation Will Probably Extend to the Office of the Superintendent of Insurance.
Plans for the Insurance investigation were practically perfected at a consultation of the Joint Committee of the Legislature yesterday, at the office of Charles E. Hughes, one of the committee's counsel. There were present at the conference Senators Armstrong and Tully, Attorneys Hughes, McKee, and Fleming, Supt. of Insurance Hendricks, and Supt. of Banks Kilburn.



September 1, 1905, New York Times, Depew Improvement Co. Repays Equitable Loan, Senator Writes That He Hastened the Reorganizers. DENIES PERSONAL LIABILITY. President Paul Morton Replies That an Erroneous and Unjust Impression Has Prevailed. DEPEW IMPROVEMENT CO. REPAYS EQUITABLE LOAN.
United States Senator Chauncey M. Depew and his associates of the Depew Improvement Company, to which in 1898 the Equitable Life Assurance Society lent $250,000 on a mortgage covering property which the State Insurance Department three years later appraised at $150,000, paid off the obligation yesterday.


September 4, 1905, New York Times, Will Ask Mr. Schiff About Equitable Deals, Committee Seeks Light on Sales by Kuhn, Loeb & Co. MR. PERKINS TO BE RECALLED. The Counsel Wish to Trace His Profits on $38,000,000 Transaction with New York Life,


September 6, 1905, New York Times, Jerome Comes Back; A Busy Month Ahead, He Will watch the Equitable and Has Several Big Cases On. HE WON'T TALK ON POLITICS. Cutting on the New Grand Jury, Which Hears Judge Foster Speak of Groundless Indictments.
District Attorney Jerome was back from Lakeville at his desk bright and early yesterday moving, showing no signs of ill-health. From his arrival until late in the afternoon his time was taken up by a steady stream of callers, many of these being friends eager to inquire about his state of health as well as his plans for the immediate future.


Sept. 12, 1905, New York Times, 1,000 Equitable Agents Hear Speech By Morton,
He Says Retrenchment Will Be the Society's Watchword. WANTS IT MORALLY STRONG
At the Manhattan Beach Convention He Says It Won't Be Run as an Adjunct to Any Banking House.
More than a thousand agents of the Equitable Life Assurance Society met at Manhattan Beach yesterday for a three days' convention. All the delegates are men and women to whom was accorded the privilege of attending on condition that they wrote a certain amount of insurance during the first three months of the year.


Sept. 16, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Case Postponed.
SCHENECTADY, N.Y., Sept. 15. -- The case of Mary S. Young of Saratoga Springs against James Hazen Hyde and the Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society of New York, which was scheduled to come before Justice John M. Kellogg at the regular term of Supreme Court in this city to-morrow, has been put over to the coming term in Saratoga County.


[Text] *Sept. 18, 1905, New York Times, Parker On Corporate Corruption Of Parties, Declares Equitable and Mutual Also Aided Republicans.
GAIN PLACED ABOVE POLITICS. Unembarrassed Raids Upon the Public Through Trusts the Reward of Campaign Contributions.


*Sept. 18, 1905, New York Times, Parker On Corporate Corrruption Of Parties, Declares Equitable and Mutual Also Aided Republicans. GAIN PLACED ABOVE POLITICS. Unembarrassed Raids Upon the Public Through Trusts the Reward of Campaign Contributions.

Sept. 20, 1905, New York Times, Larger Equitable Loan Found By Paul Morton, This Also Was Operated Through Mercantile Trust Company. ORDERS SUIT FOR RECOVERY. Society Will Also Demand the Return of $265,000 Paid on the $685,000 Transaction. LARGER EQUITABLE LOAN FOUND BY PAUL MORTON
President Paul Morton of the Equitable Life Assurance Society made public a letter yesterday which he had just sent to all the Directors, revealing the details of a second "Yellow Dog" loan transaction in the Equitable, operated through the Mercantile Trust Company, of proportions materially greater than the $685,000 loan to James W. Alexander and Thomas D. Jordan, which James H. Hyde secured by his indorsement as Vice President of the society.


September 21, 1905, New York Times, Confer With President On Insurance Control, Root, Choate, Lodge, and Cortelyou See Roosevelt. HE IS FOR DRASTIC LAWS It Is Said That, Following Disclosures, Campaign Money May be Returned to Trust Fund Guardians.
OYSTER BAY, Sept. 20. -- An important conference is on at Sagamore Hill to-night, with the recent disclosures before the investigating committee in New York regarding campaign contributions by the insurance companies as the foremost topic of discussion. The conferrees are President Roosevelt, Secretary of State Elihu Root, ex-Ambassador Joseph H. Choate, United States Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, and Postmaster General George Bruce Cortelyou.


Sept. 23, 1905, New York Times, Committee Turns To the Equitable; Finds Three Syndicates Not Reported by Frick or Hendricks. UNION PACIFIC PREFERRED DEAL, And Other Transactions of J.H. Hyde and Associates -- Nylic Explained.
Turning from the New York Life for the time being, Counsel Charles E. Hughes of the Insurance Investigating Committee took up yesterday the syndicate operations of the Equitable Life and laid the groundwork for an analysis of these transactions which bids fair to be no less searching than that which he has made of the syndicate participations of the other life insurance companies.


Sept. 23, 1905, New York Times, Mr. Cleveland Reports On Equitable Affairs,
Policy Holders Not Sufficiently Interested in Mutualization.
The ex-President's Letter in Response to the Insurance Committee's Request for Information.
Before the insurance investigating committee began its hearings Chairman Armstrong requested a statement from ex-President Cleveland, Chairman of the Equitable Life Assurance Society Trustees, on what they were doing in the way of mutualization. Chairman Armstrong read Mr. Cleveland's reply at the hearing yesterday. It was written under date of Sept. 18 and is:


Sept. 24, 1905, New York Times, Will Ask Mr. Schiff About Equitable Deals, Committee Seeks Light on Sales by Kuhn, Loeb & Co. MR. PERKINS TO BE RECALLED
The Counsel Wish to Trace His Profits on $38,000,000 Transaction with New York Life.


Sept. 25, 1905, New York Times, Letter, A Question for Equitable Trustees. CHINESE STUDENTS' VIEW.


Sept.. 26, 1905, New York Times, Wants To Know More Of Equitable Records,
Committee Preparing Questions for the Real Syndicate Factors. TO CALL PERKINS AGAIN. Morton Sorry About Cafe Savarin Situation, but it Must Continue for the Present.
When the Armstrong committee takes up its investigation of insurance to-morrow the syndicate transactions of the Equitable will again be the subject of attention, and it is probable that the examination of Henry Rogers Winthrop, the Assistant Secretary and Financial Manager of the company, will be continued, with a view to getting all the data obtainable from the society's records before questioning the men who conducted the various transactions.


*Sept. 26, 1905, New York Times, Morton Takes Root’s House, Equitable Head to Occupy New Home of the Secretary of State.
Paul Morton, President of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, has taken a lease of Elihu Root's house at the southeast corner of Park Avenue and Seventy-first Street.
The house, which stands on a plot 42.6 by 100, was finished only recently, having been built from plans by Carrere & Hastings on land bought from Charles Dana Gibson in 1903. Mr. Root sold his former residence, at 25 East Sixty-ninth Street , several months ago, intending to occupy his new house, but his appointment as Secretary of State necessitating his removal to Washington, has caused him to abandon this plan.


Sept. 27, 1905, New York Times, On the Equitable's Political Fund Trail, Morton and Hughes Are Both Looking Up the Squire Account. AND SUITS MAY BE BROUGHT. Mr. Morton Announces That the Society's Assets Approximate Those in the Official Reports.


[Text] September 28, 1905, The Minneapolis Journal, Depew's Protests and Lame Excuse


[Text] The Minneapolis journal., September 28, 1905, Page 1, Column 3, Equitable Cash Enriches Depew


September 28, 1905, The Minneapolis Journal, OATHS GIVE THE LIE TO INSURANCE MEN. TEXAS SHOWS UP NEW YORK LIFE, Sworn Statements That No Money Was Given to 1896 Campaign Fund.


Sept. 28, 1905, New-York Tribune, More "Yellow Dog" Funds, page 1, Equitable's Inside Wheels Uncovered at Prolonged Session of Committee. OFFICIALS PROFITED IN SYNDICATES. Entire Burden, Except Taking the Proceeds. Occasionally Borne by Society--Its Share from Some Deals Disappeared. OFFICIALS CONTROLLED SEVERAL SECRET FUNDS. "YELLOW DOG" "ACCOUNTS REPLENISHED FROM SYNDICATES, KNOWN AND UNKNOWN.

Sept. 28, 1905, New-York Tribune, page 2, Made $626,096 Loan Through a $2,000 Clerk, EQUITABLE'S METHOD OF GETTING ATLANTIC COASTLINE BONDS OFF ITS BOOKS, MR. WINTHROP SAYS. FURNISHED ALL FUNDS AND SHARED PROFITS. EQUITABLE DID NOT EVEN CHARGE ITS ASSOCIATES INTEREST IN ONE CASE-ACCOUNTS IN CHAOS


September 28, 1905, The Minneapolis Journal, Policyholders Pay, Money Kings Reap. page 1, DEPEW'S PROTESTS AND LAME EXCUSE. EQUITABLE CASH ENRICHES DEPEW. All Sorts of Corporate Trickery Revealed in Insurance Men's Big Deals. OATHS GIVE THE LIE TO INSURANCE MEN. SWORN STATEMENTS IN FLAT CONFLICT.


September 29, 1905, The Evening World, Banker Schiff Admits He Was Insurance Dummy, page 1, Head of Kuhn Loeb Co Frankly Admits as a Witness Before the Insurance Investigators that as a Director and Finance Committee Member He Did Not Know How the Business Was Run.


Sept. 28, 1905, New York Times, More Syndicates In the Equitable, $100,000 of Profits Not on Books, but on Squire Account. NEW PARTICIPATORS FOUND. They Are Depew, Cuyler, Wheelock, and C.B. Alexander -- Burlington Syndicate Profits with No Risk.
The insurance investigators got to work under the guidance of Counsel Charles E. Hughes yesterday on the "George H. Squire, Trustee, account" in the Equitable Life, which President Morton of the society and the insurance investigators themselves discovered only as the result of the testimony given by the Assistant Secretary, Henry Rogers Winthrop, at the last session of the investigation.



Oct. 1, 1905, New York Times, Hoyt Quits Equitable, Howard H. Hoyt, Western Superintendent Made Vice President of Chicago Company.


October 13, 1905, The Auburn Citizen, Page 1, Column 1, Hyde Will Appear, Insurance Investigators to Get Desired Testimony. HIS FRIENDS ARE DIVIDED. Some Urging Him to Make Clean Breast of It; Others Are Opposed.


October 13, 1905, New York Times, Hyde May Appear Now And Tell His Story, Untermyer, His Lawyer, Has a Talk with Hughes. HAMILTON NOT BACK YET. The Committee Will Ask If Answers to Mutual Advertisements Are Turned Over to Raymond & Co.
Samuel Untermyer, counsel for James H. Hyde and William H. McIntyre, who are wanted as witnesses by the Insurance Investigating Committee, had a talk yesterday with Charles H. Hughes, the committee's counsel. It is believed that they talked about the question whether Mr. Hyde and Mr. McIntyre would return to the jurisdiction of the committee and appear voluntarily before it.


Oct. 26, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Receipts Jump $2,000,000, Current Expenses in the Last Nine Months Cut $414,000. MOST OF THE GAIN RECENT The Expenses for the Third Quarter $809,913 Lower -- Receipts in Premiums Heavier.
Figures from President Morton's reports for the third quarter of the current year and for the last nine months were made public at yesterday's meeting of the Equitable Life Assurance Society's Directors. The report shows that in the last nine months the receipts were $55,772,000, an increase of about $2,000,000 over those for the corresponding period last year.


October 29, 1905, New York Times, Subsidiary Companies, Magnitude of Insurance Companies' Banking Interests. WHAT THE SYSTEM IS Wall Street Interested in Outcome of Issue Over Insurance Investments in Banks and Trust Companies.
Wall Street is watching with considerable interest the development of the issue between Counsel Charles E. Hughes of the Insurance Investigating Committee and some of his committeemen, on the one hand, and the officials of the several life insurance companies on the other, as to the wisdom of having a life insurance establishment include the control of subsidiary banking institutions.


October 29, 1905, New York Times, Justice Has Young Case, Argument Closed in Suit Against Former Equitable Officers.
SARATOGA, Oct. 28. -- Before Justice Henry T. Kellogg of Plattsburg, in Special Term of the Supreme Court here today, arguments were heard in the action of Mrs. Mary S. Young of Saratoga Springs to have restored funds alleged to have been wasted by the Equitable Life Assurance Society, through the negligence of the defendants, James H. Hyde and other officials.


Oct. 30, 1905, New York Times, Alexander’s Sacrifice, Started Equitable Crisis to Clear His Conscience, Dr. Stimson Says.
The Rev. Dr. Henry A. Stimson, pastor of the Manhattan Congregational Church, preached yesterday on "Money and Men." He said, in part:



November 3, 1905, New York Times, Morton Wants Race For Business To Stop, Tells Pittsburg Agents the Equitable Will Aim at Quality. THE ASSETS ALL SECURE, The Society's President Adds That All "Strike" Suits Will Be Fought Vigorously.


November 3, 1905, New York Times, Builders In Bankruptcy, The Equitable Among the Creditors of Northrup & Latcher of Utica.


November 6, 1905, New York Times, Lowers Book Values of Equitable Assets, Hunter Deducts $5,000,000 in the Real Estate item. SHAVES AGENTS' BALANCES. Real Estate Change to Reach a Carrying Basis -- Agents' Balances Not Excluded from Assets.
The final report of Deputy Superintendent of Insurance Hunter as a result of his examination of the Equitable Life Assurance Society was made public yesterday.


November 8, 1905, New York Times, Indorse President Morton, British Holders of Equitable Policies Meet in London.


November 15, 1905, New York Times, John S. Williams for the Equitable.


November 16, 1905, The Daily Colonist [Victoria B.C.] Page 1, Column 3, Harriman And Hyde, President of Union Pacific Denies Testimony of Former Equitable Official. Ex-Vice President Was Offered $7,000,000 For His Holdings In Company. Was Anxious to Secure Ambasadorship at the French Capital.


November 18, 1905, New York Times, Harriman Retaliates, Report That He Will Ask Employes to Withdraw from Equitable.


November 18, 1905, New York Times, Depew Hazy About Equitable Letters; As to a "Friend Who Usually Gets Around This Time of Year." SENATOR FORGETS WHO HE IS, But Sure the "Friend" Wasn't Connected with the Legislature -- Tarbell a Witness. Counsel Charles E. Hughes of the insurance investigating committee took up yesterday the legal expenses of the Equitable Life, with some surprising results. The examination resulted in the abrupt recall of Senator Chauncey M. Depew to the witness stand, to explain some letters found in the archives of the Equitable.


November 20, 1905, New York Times, No More Insurance Graft.; Payment for Legislation Gone By, Says New Equitable Director
CHICAGO, Nov. 19. -- E.W. Bloomingdale of New York is at the Auditorium Hotel, having come from Canton, where as one of the Trustees of the McKinley Memorial Association he attended the laying of the cornerstone of the McKinley Memorial last Thursday. Mr. Bloomingdale, who is one of the newly chosen Directors of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, said:


November 23, 1905, New York Times, Need Many Reforms, Tarbell Declares, Equitable's Officer Would Forbid Campaign Contributions. WOULD HAVE MORE PUBLICITY.Tells That He Received Commissions from the Equitable on Policies on His Own Life.


November 25, 1905, New York Times, May Amend Equitable's Charter, Court Holds, Appellate Division Declares Legislature Has This Power. BUT SUSTAINS LORD'S SUIT, Mutualization Already Voted Held Invalid, but Legislature May Pass an Act Enabling Future Action.
The Appellate Division of the Supreme Court, with only Justice Hooker dissenting, handed down a decision yesterday afternoon sustaining the interlocutory judgment rendered by Justice Maddox in favor of Franklin B. Lord, who sued last Spring to restrain the mutualization of the Equitable Life Assurance Society that was voted by the Board of Directors before the purchase of the majority stock by Thomas F. Ryan.


November 25, 1911, The New York Times, John F. Dryden Dies Worth $50,000,000. Ex-Senator from New Jersey Succumbs to Pneumonia, Following an Operation". JOHN F. DRYDEN'S FUNERAL.; Many Prominent Financiers Attend Simple


November 27, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Experts Report, Accountants Find the Society's Assets Are $416,166,500.


November 29, 1905, New York Times, No Equitable Turkey, Thanksgiving Custom in Denver Office Is Abolished.


November 29, 1905, The Indiana County Gazette, ABSOLUTE PUBLICITY, Tarbell Suggests It as Chief Remedy for Existing Abuses of Insurance Companies. $400,000 ON HIS OWN LIFE, On All Policies of Self and Family He Received the Commission on Premiums—Admits Officials Have Done Wrong and Should Be Punished.


November 30, 1905, New York Times, Equitable's Funds Put at $410,044,926; Gain of $5,590,000 Over Figures as of June 30. ASSETS ARE FIGURED LOW
Hendricks's Appraisal as of June 30 Put the Total at $406,073,063 -- Three Directors Elected
The accountants who have been making an examination of the condition of the Equitable Life Assurance Society submitted a partial report to the Board of Directors yesterday. Total funds of the society on Sept. 30, 1905, are given as $410,044,926, as compared with $404,454,710 on June 30.



December 1, 1905, New York Times, Threatens the Equitable, Germany Demands That the Society Increase Its Reserve.
BERLIN, Nov. 30. -- The Imperial Insurance Office has informed the representative here of the Equitable Life Assurance Society of New York that it will appoint a receiver to administer on the company's property in Germany in the interest of the German policy holders unless the company increases its premium reserves invested in Germany, as required by the insurance law of May, 1901.


December 3, 1905, New York Times, Mr. Ryan To Be Called In Insurance Inquiry,The Committee Will Ask His Plans for the Equitable.
NO ALLIANCES FOR MUTUAL, Many Trustees Will Oppose Any Reorganization Likely to be Dominated by Any Particular Interest.
Thomas F. Ryan will be called as a witness in the insurance investigation at an early date. This announcement was made yesterday by James McKeen, associate counsel with Charles E. Hughes for the Armstrong investigating committee. While the exact date of Mr. Ryan's appearance has not yet been fixed, it is improbable that he will take the stand this week.


December 8, 1905, New York Times, Says Suit Must Wait, Attorney General Will Not Permit Action Against Equitable Now.
ALBANY, Dec. 7. -- Attorney General Mayer informed the firm of Dittenhoefer, Gerber James to-day, representing the Lincoln National Bank of New York, that he would not consider an application from them to sue the Equitable Life Assurance Society until after the Armstrong Investigating Committee had made its report to the Legislature.
DELAY FOR THE MUTUAL.
Question of Pressidency Won't Be Settled for a Time.


December 9, 1905, New York Times, Ryan Won’t Tell, Jerome Called In, Wouldn't Describe Equitable Talk with Harriman. THIS ON COUNSEL'S ADVICE. Has Divested Himself of All Voting Control of Equitable Stock -- Bought It to Avert Panic.
Thomas F. Ryan told the Armstrong investigating committee yesterday that on June 8 last, when he bought the majority stock of the Equitable Life Assurance Society from James H. Hyde, and thereafter for approximately a week, Edward H. Harriman importuned him to be allowed to participate in the ownership of the society.


December 10, 1905, New York Times, Trouble For Odell In State Committee, May Come If Insurance Testimony Involves Him Further. HANGS ON RYAN TESTIMONY. Insurance Matters May Also Cause Gov. Higgins to Favor Assemblyman Cox for Speaker.


December 13, 1905, New York Times, Ryan Now Tells of Harriman Talk; Half Interest in Equitable Purchase Was Demanded. THREAT OF OPPOSITION MADE. Harriman Said He'd Throw Influence Against Ryan If Not Allowed to Participate
Following his decision to tell the Armstrong Committee what Edward H. Harriman said to him in trying to get admitted to the purchase of the majority stock of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, Thomas F. Ryan appeared a second time before the Armstrong Investigating Committee yesterday.



December 15, 1905, New York Times, Says Provident Life Records Were Stolen, Sold to a Rival Company, Declares President Scott. EQUITABLE DEBT BROUGHT UP Mr. Harriman Does Not Testify Before Insurance Inquiry -- May Take the Stand To-day.
Declaring that records had been stolen from the Provident Savings Life Assurance Society and taken to the Equitable Life, and that enemies have been trying to injure him, his family, his company, and its policy holders, President Edward W. Scott of the Provident Life brought what had been a rather dull session of the insurance inquiry to a dramatic climax yesterday.


December 18, 1905, New York Times, Equitable Economies Save $600,000 Yearly; Restitutions Amount to a Million, Says Morton. INTERNAL INQUIRY'S RESULT Assets, Accountants Declare, Are Worth $416,166,500 -- To be an Annual Audit After This. EQUITABLE ECONOMIES SAVE $600,000 YEARLY
President Paul Morton of the Equitable Life Assurance Society has sent out to policy holders a letter in which he summarizes the results of his investigation into the Equitable's affairs and gives his views on various matters connected with its business. In his letter Mr. Morton says:


December 19, 1905, New York Times, The Equitable's Business.
It will be the general opinion that the policy holders of the Equitable are to be congratulated upon the letter addressed to them by President PAUL MORTON, in which he sets forth the result of the investigation of the Society's affairs by British and New York accountants employed for that purpose.


December 22, 1905, New York Times, In the Real Estate Field,;
Equitable Life Sells Group of Sixteen Dwellings in Harlem -- Resale of Fifth Avenue Residence -- Another Building Operation in Dyckman Tract.
Goodwin Goodwin have sold for the Equitable Life Assurance Society to Schinasi Brothers sixteen three-story dwellings at the southeast corner of Manhattan Avenue and 115th Street. The houses are known as 346 to 354 Manhattan Avenue and 304 to 324 West 115th Street.