Sunday, January 06, 2008

Sgt. Louis Briscese: Reservists Called Onto Duty with Foreknowledge?

"The National Museum of Health and Medicine has unveiled an exhibit highlighting efforts used by its parent organization, the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), to identify the victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks at the Pentagon..."

But also unveiled, at least to me, is the name and job title of an Air Force photographer--U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Louis Briscese, of the Forensic Photography Office of the Armed Forces Medical Examiner.

This photograph is labeled "Montgomery County, MD firefighters extinguish the flames at the Pentagon. Photo by U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Louis Briscese, of the Forensic Photography Office of the Armed Forces Medical Examiner (AFIP.)"

The title should read "Five anonymous co-conspirators pose for a propaganda shot beside an American flag while they shoot water onto an aviation fuel fire."


This photograph is titled, "Police and EMS equipment in the foreground at the Pentagon. Photo by U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Louis Briscese, of the Forensic Photography Office of the Armed Forces Medical Examiner (AFIP.)"

Its title should read "Another generic shot of unattended fire burning with the foreground blocked. Taken around noon (check out the sun angle on the van.)"

How an army forensic photographer got onto the scene so early is one question. Why such banal images are being used in a medical museum exhibit is another question. Like Sgt. Thomas "Nate" Orme, one must ask when these men were called into duty and whether or not this represents clear evidence of foreknowledge.